metropolitan

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metropolitan

1. constituting a city and its suburbs
2. of, relating to, or designating an ecclesiastical metropolis
3. of or belonging to the home territories of a country, as opposed to overseas territories
4. 
a. Eastern Churches the head of an ecclesiastical province, ranking between archbishop and patriarch
b. Church of England an archbishop
c. RC Church an archbishop or bishop having authority in certain matters over the dioceses in his province
References in periodicals archive ?
16) Muscovy escaped religious war between Catholic and Protestant, but because the Orthodox Church was inadequately confessionalized before the end of the 17th century, it was not possible for Moscow to completely suppress regional separatist feeling based on the competing claims to spiritual primacy of the Novgorod and Kiev metropolitanates.
These statistics are important in order to understand church-state relations in the country, and to understand why the MOC, represented by the Metropolitanate of Chisinau and All Moldova, has been favored by government.
As mentioned, the Catholic metropolitanate of Kiev was suppressed by Moscow in 1805.
This norm, which re-emerges in several forms in canonical tradition, applies to all the relations between the bishops of a region, whether those of a province, a metropolitanate, or a patriarchate.
Francis Xavier University, Canada and the Metropolitanate of Moldavia and Bukov ina, Romania
In the Life, Petr and Gerontii--rival candidates for the Metropolitanate of Kiev and All Rus--travel to Constantinople to be consecrated by the Patriarch, but due to God's favor, favorable winds and weather speed along Petr, while inclement weather holds back Gerontii, the candidate of Olgerd (Algirdas), the (pagan) Grand Duke of Lithuania.
For details of the council's preparation, see Borys Gudziak, Crisis and Reform: The Kyivan Metropolitanate, the Patriarchate of Constantinople, and the Genesis of the Union of Brest (Cambridge, MA: Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University, 2001).
The saints who figure in Elisabeth Teiro's examination of the Russian metropolitanate during the 14th to 16th centuries are cut from very different cloth from the legendarily humble monk Sergius of Radonezh--adviser of princes, conciliator, counterpart of St.
Gudziak, Borys, Crisis and Reform: The Kyivan Metropolitanate, the Patriarchate of Constantinople, and the Genesis of the Union of Brest.
This account begins with mention of ninth-century Byzantine missions and runs up to the transfer of the metropolitanate from Kiev to Vladimir in 1299 and the institution of a new metropolitanate of Galich (Halych) in 1303.
In Ivan's reign there were two crucial events in church-state relations, the Council of a Hundred Chapters in 1551 and the short metropolitanate of Filipp, 1566-69.

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