Paris Observatory

(redirected from Meudon Observatory)

Paris Observatory

The French national astronomical research institute, located in Paris and founded in 1667. There are observing facilities at the Meudon Observatory, near Sèvres, which has two reflecting telescopes (1 meter and 0.6 meter) and forms the astrophysics section of the Paris Observatory, and at the Nançay Radio Observatory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: feasibility study of the creation of a museum space in the "grand dome" castle of the meudon observatory
Slipher's determined efforts to do so, their very best images only revealed broad, diffuse linear features, very similar to those drawn by Eugene Antoniadi using the 32.6-inch refractor at Meudon Observatory in Paris.
The same features have been seen by professionals at Meudon Observatory, Pic du Midi Observatory etc.
"The discovery was made photographically by Audouin Dollfus, well-known planetary and lunar specialist of Meudon Observatory ...
Subsequently, the astronomers of Meudon Observatory reprocessed the plates with the 'composite' technique advocated by Bernard Lyot in 1941: for each plate, the eight or ten best images are selected and stacked under the enlarger, to produce a single averaged image.
On April 18, 1982, they aimed Meudon Observatory's 102-centimeter refractor at a star (AGK3 + 17[deg.]1309) whose location was close to where 146 Lucina was due to pass in its orbit.
Eighty years later the French astronomer and optician Andre Couder was able to reproduce the luminous spot in his laboratory at Meudon Observatory in Paris.
Antoniadi, helped to demolish the 'canal' network through his groundbreaking observations with the 83cm OG of Meudon Observatory. The occasion will be marked by an international conference in September, which the undersigned will attend on behalf of the Association.
As the director of the Meudon Observatory outside of Paris, he had access to some of the best celestial views of the time.
Moore, using the 83cm refractor of Meudon Observatory, described a feature inside the crater Cassini A.
The Greek astronomer Eugene Antoniadi (1870-1944), who made a long series of observations of Mercury during the 1920s using the 33-inch refractor of the Meudon Observatory near Paris, drew up a chart of the planet on which he gave markings names inspired by Graeco-Roman mythology.
"The first astronomical work with a balloon-borne telescope apparently dates from May 30, 1954, when we at Meudon Observatory [in Paris] undertook to determine the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere of Mars."