Meyerbeer


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Meyerbeer

Giacomo , real name Jakob Liebmann Beer. 1791--1864, German composer, esp of operas, such as Robert le diable (1831) and Les Huguenots (1836)
References in periodicals archive ?
Nella Filosofia della musica, l'autore cita alcuni autori e opere esemplari--Byron, Goethe, Schiller e, per la musica, Weber, Mozart (Don Giovanni), Meyerbeer (Robert le diable), Beethoven--ma e proprio su Meyerbeer che la sua riflessione ritornera negli anni londinesi e, a partire dagli anni 1860, in particolare su Les Huguenots (1836) che diverranno Yexemplum assoluto.
Wagner was not just a Jew-hater, then, but a backstabbing self-promoter who defamed the Jewish artists he emulated and who (in Meyerbeer's case) had advanced his career.
Wagner traduced the Jewish Meyerbeer on racial grounds, whilst Mendelssohn and Schumann denounced Meyerbeer's streak of healthy vulgarity, although the usually squeamish Chopin revered him.
TOMORROW Coventry Youth Orchestra, conductor Brian Chappell, soloist Eleanor Percy - Meyerbeer, Dvorak, Bruch: All Saints Parish Church, The Parade, Leamington, 7.30pm.
The program will include Giacomo Meyerbeer's "Torch Dance Fackeltanz," Norman Dello Joio's "Satiric Dances," Grainger's "Australian Up-Country Tune," John Zdechlik's "Chorale and Shaker Dance," and a new work by David Maslanka, "Give Us This Day." Robert Ponto and Timothy Paul will conduct.
of Salzburg; and the Maryville Institute of Birmingham, UK) and Pellegrini (Italian literature and history, Giulio Riva College) provide researchers a comprehensive list of primary and secondary works from Mayerbeer's correspondence and diaries to materials from the Meyerbeer and Scribe Archives,general studies of his life and work (including his fan club web site) and family materials on his ancestry and life as a German Jew.
3; Grand duo concertante E major on a theme from Meyerbeer's opera Robert le Diable for cello and piano; Trio in G minor for piano, violin and cello op.
He soon befriended the most renowned artists in the city, including Musset, Gautier, Hugo, Sand, Berlioz, and Meyerbeer, and his own work was praised by prominent critics such as Philarete Chasles and Nerval, who, in an issue of the Revue des deux mondes (July 1848), flatteringly portrayed Heine as "un Voltaire pittoresque et sentimental, un sceptique du xviiie siecle, argente par les doux rayons bleus du clair de lune allemand." Banville's Mes Souvenirs (1882) is perhaps one of the last books written in French to evoke the German poet's significant influence on the literary and artistic circles of the rime.
This article looks at Meyerbeer's last grand opera, L'Africaine (1865), and relates several interconnected themes embedded in the plot-slavery, religious bigotry, the 'black legend' of Iberian confessional government and colonial expansion in the sixteenth century, and interracial love--to the mid-nineteenth-century, largely French, context out of which the opera itself was produced over a protracted gestation period of almost thirty years and several different librettists.
They will be playing music spanning three centuries, including Johny Barry and Franz Waxman classics, Goff Richards' Hymns of Praise and the Gordon Langford arrangement of the Coronation March from the opera The Prophet by Meyerbeer.
"Jews in Music" is directed in part at his former inspirations Felix Mendelssohn and Heinrich Heine, whom he mentions by name, as well as the unnamed onetime benefactor Giacomo Meyerbeer. In this essay, Wagner claims that Jewish music lacked emotion, was characterized by coldness and indifference, triviality and nonsense.
In this new study, the author brings to life the premieres of five operas: Handel's Giulio Cesare [1724], Mozart's Don Giovanni [1787], Meyerbeer's Les Huguenots [1836], Wagner's Das Rheingold [1876], and Verdi's Otello [1887].