Mezentius


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Mezentius

Etrurian king put his subjects to death by binding them to dead men and letting them starve. [Rom. Legend: Benét, 664]
See: Cruelty
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Yet Mezentius is immediately contradicted by another vassal, Messapus, who responds in an emotional and insulting manner, essentially accusing the extremely reasonable Mezentius of acting irrationally (5470-71).
1139-40), and Aeneas himself becomes the slayer of a noble son in the act of sacrificing himself for his father, Mezentius, who in turn is shown to be stricken by mortal grief and to go to his own death as a direct consequence.
37) Even Mezentius concedes to Aeneas after his son Lausus is killed, nullum in caede nefas ('there is no evil in slaughter', Aen.
Mistress of Mistresses tells of the Three Kingdoms of Zimiamvia, a tripartite empire thrown into turmoil by the assassination of its king, Mezentius.
In the catalogue of the Italic allies of Turnus, in Book VII of the Aeneid, the third place is occupied by the warriors coming from Tibur (after those commanded by Mezentius and by Aventinus).
HINC QVOQVE, id est Mantua atque ex eius populis, QVINGENTOS IN SE MEZENTIVS ARMAT: in se, aduersum se armat Mezentius, pulchra locutio.
The Oldham elegy (1684) with its Virgilian echoes, the stories of Nisus and Euryalus from Aeneid v and IX, and of Lausus and Mezentius from Aeneid x, which appear in Sylvae (1685), all testify to his apprehension of heroes' capacity to inspire love and emulation.
If it has to be mutilated, it would be a savagery worthy of an Ezzelino or a Mezentius to oblige a father to mangle his son with his own hand; and a savagery as useless as inhumane, since it would either be a matter of purging the opera of its defects or of adapting it to the occasion, actors, theatre and the circumstances of the country it was to be given in.
49) The catalogue begins with the impious Mezentius, the epitome of Italian ferocity and the antithesis of Trojan piety.
We usually locate this gesture in the practice of Virgil's Mezentius, who would "link the living with / dead bodies, fitting hand to hand and face / to face" (componens manibusque manus atque oribus ora).
He feels pity for those who are trying to prevent him from accomplishing his aim--Dido, Lausus the son of Mezentius, and even Turnus.
Here Mezentius and his son Lausas are slain by Aeneas.