microarray

(redirected from Microarray technology)
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microarray

A technique for performing many DNA experiments in parallel. Nothing to do with computers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microarray technology has revolutionized studies of gene expression.
To understand complex networks that tailor genomic output to the needs of the cell, it seems microarray technology has proven effective in studying the process gene by gene.
In the press release, a background of the development of microarray technology is given.
Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a powerful method for profiling transcription factor binding to a gene, but is ineffective with the microarray technology that has been developed to speed up the process.
The robust design allows data entities (tables of the identical type of data) and their relationships in the databases to be conveniently added and modified to accommodate needs of ever-evolving microarray technology and public databases.
The Institute for Genomic Research licensed Biolog's Phenotype MicroArray technology ...
Proteomics today; protein assessment and biomarkers using mass spectrometry, 2D electrohoresis, and microarray technology.
In this regard, a prime advantage of DNA microarray technology is the relatively large volume of transcript information gained from a single analysis, which could be viewed as a "high information density" technology.
The series of lawsuits began in 1998 when Affymetrix sued Incyte for infringement on five patents related to microarray technology. In 2000, Incyte filed a counter lawsuit alleging infringement on two of its RNA amplification patents.
Microarray technology, note Joos (biochemistry, NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute, U.
Genes associated with wound repair are expressed in fibroblasts in response to serum, including the Col3a1 gene; and clusters of these genes have also been identified using microarray technology (Iyer et al.
By 2002, the market, including initial systems, aftermarket and service, is forecasted to top $1 billion, according to SDi's market analyses and perspectives report, "Microarray Technology: The Next Step in Genomic and Proteomic Analysis."