cantilever

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cantilever

(kăn`təlēvər), beam supported rigidly at one end to carry a load along the free arm or at the free end. A slanting beam fixed at the base is often used to support the free end, as in a common bracket. The springboard is a simple cantilever beam, and the cantilever design is often used for canopies, balconies, sidewalks outside the trusses of bridges, and large cranes such as those used in shipyards. By the use of cantilever trusses, obstructing columns are eliminated in theaters. The cantilever principle is one of the methods that may be used in constructing a bridgebridge,
structure built over water or any obstacle or depression to allow the passage of pedestrians or vehicles. See also viaduct. Early Bridges

In ancient times and among primitive peoples a log was thrown across a stream, or two vines or woven fibrous ropes (the
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.

Cantilever

A structural member or any other element projecting beyond its supporting wall or column and weighted at one end to carry a proportionate weight on the projecting end.

Cantilever

 

a structure (for example, a girder or a truss) with one end that is stably secured and another that is free; it can also be a part of a structure extending beyond the support. A cantilever is generally used when the installation of additional supports is impossible or inadvisable (for example, the supporting structure of a balcony or ledge). An outrigger is a form of cantilever. A distinctive feature of a cantilever is that determination of load stresses does not require preliminary calculation of bearing pressures but examination of the conditions of equilibrium of the free part of the cantilever.


Cantilever

 

an overhanging support element or structure used to attach parts of machines or structures to a vertical wall or column. Structurally, cantilevers are made as an independent part with a diagonal strut or as a considerably thickened portion of the basic element.

Cantilevers are usually used for the installation of bearings, individual machine assemblies, and equipment on transmission towers and supports. In architecture, which uses ordered elements, a cantilever, or corbel, is usually a projection from within a wall, which is often shaped (with decorative scrolls, volutes, or other ornamentations). The cantilever is used for supporting balconies or greatly protruding cornices.

cantilever

[′kant·əl‚ē·vər]
(engineering)
A beam or member securely fixed at one end and hanging free at the other end.
(engineering)
In particular, in an atomic force microscope a very small beam that has a tip attached to its free end; the deflection of the beam is used to measure the force acting on the tip.

Cantilever

A linear structural member supported both transversely and rotationally at one end only; the other end of the member is free to deflect and rotate. Cantilevers are common throughout nature and engineered structures; examples are a bird's wing, an airplane wing, a roof overhang, and a balcony. See Wing

A horizontal cantilever must be counterbalanced at its one support against rotation. This requirement is simply achieved in the design of a playground seesaw, with its double-balanced cantilever. This principle of counterbalancing the cantilever is part of the basic design of a crane, such as a tower crane (see illustration). More commonly, horizontal cantilevers are resisted by being continuous with a backup span that is supported at both ends. This design is common for cantilever bridges; all swing bridges or drawbridges are cantilevers. See Bridge

Cantilever configuration in the form of a tower support craneenlarge picture
Cantilever configuration in the form of a tower support crane

Vertical cantilevers primarily resist lateral wind loads and horizontal loads created by earthquakes. Common vertical cantilevers are chimneys, stacks, masts, flagpoles, lampposts, and railings or fences. All skyscrapers are vertical cantilevers. One common system to provide the strength to resist lateral loads acting on the skyscraper is the use of a truss (known as bracing). See Buildings, Shear, Truss

Some of the largest cantilevers are used in the roofs of airplane hangars. It has become common practice to include cantilevers in the design of theaters and stadiums, where an unobstructed view is desired; balconies and tiers are supported in the back and cantilevered out toward the stage or playing field so that the audience has column-free viewing. See Beam, Roof construction

cantilever

cantilever, 2
1. A beam, girder, truss, or structural member or surface that projects horizontally beyond its vertical support, such as a wall or column.
2. A projecting bracket used for carrying the cornice or extended eaves of a building.

cantilever

cantilever
An example of cantilever.
A structure having sufficient internal stiffness to resist a tendency to bend under its own load when supported at one end only. Modern aircraft wings are cantilever structures, and the term is also applied to unbraced undercarriages.

cantilever

1. 
a. a beam, girder, or structural framework that is fixed at one end and is free at the other
b. (as modifier): a cantilever wing
2. a wing or tailplane of an aircraft that has no external bracing or support
3. a part of a beam or a structure projecting outwards beyond its support
References in periodicals archive ?
The MMVS100 microcantilever mercury-vapor sensor is a miniature, battery-operated device that can rapidly detect sub-ppm levels of mercury vapor in gases and fluids.
The microcantilever thermometer has a much larger measurement range (up to 3,000 C [degrees] compared to only 500 C [degrees] for conventional devices); 5 times greater sensitivity; 20 times greater precision; and 500 times faster response times - all for about the same price.
Active microcantilever beams due to their structural flexibility and sensitivity to atomic and molecular forces have received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measuring applications, including atomic force microscopy, thermal scanning microscopy, and biomass sensing.
[26] evaluated a microactuator device by electrodepositing a polypyrrole film onto the gold-coated side of an AFM microcantilever. It was observed that the volume change of the polypyrrole film is responsible for the mechanical motion [27].
In this work, a commercial piezo-resistive microcantilever (Seiko Instruments Inc.) was used, as shown in Figure 1.
[16.] Loui A, Goericke FT, Ratto TV, Lee J, Hart BR, King WP (2008) The effect of piezoresistive microcantilever geometry on cantilever sensitivity during surface stress chemical sensing.
From this series of micrographs, it is evident that through the directed motion of the micropipette (on the left side of the droplet), away from the microcantilever (on the right side of the droplet), both the bitumen droplet and the microcantilever are translated to the left.
Remaining chapters describe particular technologies, including explosives detection based on amplifying fluorescence polymers, ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectrometry for security screening of explosives, explosive vapor detection using microcantilever sensors, lab-on-a-chip detection of explosives, nanoscale sensing assemblies using quantum dot-protein bioconjugates, and remote sensing of explosive materials using differential reflection spectrometry.
For AFM imaging, specimens (different from those used for FTIR and LSCM measurements) were periodically removed from the laboratory and outdoor chambers and analyzed using a Dimension 3100 scanning probe microscope (Digital Instruments) operated in tapping mode and commercial Si microcantilever probes.
Protiveris will be applying these sensor technologies to microcantilever measurements of biomolecular interactions.
Nonlinear dynamic analysis of a v shaped microcantilever of an atomic force microscope, Applied Mathematical Modelling 35: 5903-5919.
ZnO microrods were grown on the microcantilever surface and the measurement of resonance frequency of the microcantilever vibrations under the exposure of CO gas was carried out.