electrode

(redirected from Microelectrodes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

electrode,

terminal through which electric current passes between metallic and nonmetallic parts of an electric circuit. In most familiar circuits current is carried by metallic conductors, but in some circuits the current passes for some distance through a nonmetallic conductor. For example, in electrolysiselectrolysis
, passage of an electric current through a conducting solution or molten salt that is decomposed in the process. The Electrolytic Process

The electrolytic process requires that an electrolyte, an ionized solution or molten metallic salt, complete an
..... Click the link for more information.
 current passes through a liquid electrolyte; in a fluorescent lamp current passes through a gas. An electrode is usually in the form of a wire, rod, or plate. It may be made of a metal, e.g., copper, lead, platinum, silver, or zinc, or of a nonmetal, commonly carbon. The electrode through which current passes from the metallic to the nonmetallic conductor is called the anode, and that through which current passes from the nonmetallic to the metallic conductor, the cathode. (Electron flow is in a direction opposite that of conventionally defined current.) In most familiar electric devices, current flows from the terminal at higher electric potential (the positive electrode) to the terminal at lower electric potential (the negative electrode); therefore, the anode is usually the positive electrode and the cathode the negative electrode. In some electric devices, e.g., an electric battery, nonelectric energy is converted to electric energy, causing current to flow within the device from the negative electrode to the positive electrode, so that the anode is the negative electrode and the cathode is the positive electrode.

Electrode

 

a structural component of an electronic, ion, or electrical engineering device or production apparatus. It consists of a conductor with a specific shape, which connects a section of an electric circuit in contact with a working medium—a vacuum (in the practical sense), gas, semiconductor, or liquid—to the remainder of the circuit (which is formed by conductors).

The electrodes of electronic devices (electron tubes, electronbeam instruments, semiconductor devices, and so on) are usually in the form of a plate, grid, cylinder, or the like. They have a wide variety of functions. For example, as cathodes and photocathodes, they act as sources of electrons; as grids (control, shield, and suppressor types) and the electrodes of electron guns, they are used to create within a device electric fields that control the motion of electrons and ions in the working medium; as anodes (plates), they collect electrons.


Electrode

 

in electrochemistry, a metal, oxide, or other electrical conductor in contact with an ionic conductor, such as an electrolytic solution or a fused electrolyte. The most important characteristic of electrodes is the electrode potential established at the electrode-electrolyte boundary. Depending on use, electrodes may be classified as reference, indicator, and other types. Systems of two different electrodes can be used as chemical sources of current; when direct current passes through such systems, they act as electrolytic cells.

electrode

[i′lek‚trōd]
(electricity)
An electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
One of the terminals used in dielectric heating or diathermy for applying the high-frequency electric field to the material being heated.

electrode

1. In arc welding, the component in a welding circuit through which an electric current is conducted between the electrode holder and the arc.
2.In resistance welding, the component through which the electric current in the welding machine passes (usually accompanied by pressure) directly to the work.

electrode

1. a conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolyte, an electric arc, or an electronic valve or tube
2. an element in a semiconducting device that emits, collects, or controls the movement of electrons or holes

electrode

A device that emits, controls or receives electricity. Typically an end point or wire made of metal or some composite material, there are countless electrodes in electrical and electronics products. For example, in a vacuum tube, the cathode emitter is a "negative" electrode. The transparent wires made of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) that cross an LCD screen are electrodes. See battery, air interface and cathode.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5, 7) and can be summarized as follows: The false vocal cord on the side of the tumor was clamped with forceps and resected with a 180[degrees]-angle microelectrode. Resection of the vocal cord was performed using either the same or the 90[degrees] microelectrode by an anteroposterior deep section over the lateral limit of the vocal cord, followed by up-down sections, first one in the anterior commissure, second one in its attachment into the vocal process of the arytenoid cartilage.
Bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation using single track microelectrode recording.
Glass Insulated Carbon Fiber Microelectrodes. Carbon fiber microelectrodes have been utilized for the detection of neurotransmitters in vivo [8].
Xi et al., "Growth of nano-wrinkles on photoresist-derived carbon microelectrode array," International Journal of Nanotechnology, vol.
Sombers, "Unmasking the Effects of L-DOPA on Rapid Dopamine Signaling with an Improved Approach for Nafion Coating Carbon-Fiber Microelectrodes", Anal Chem, 88 (16), 8129-36, 2016.
The microelectrodes used in flow cytometry are fabricated by means of lithography in noble metals such as gold or platinum, which do not easily exchange charge with the ionic solution.
The rats were allowed to explore a simple labyrinth, and at a specific location within this labyrinth, individual granule cells were stimulated with weak electrical pulses (in the nanoampere range) via the microelectrode. The same electrode allowed the researchers to measure the subsequent activity of the stimulated cells.
To quantify the input resistance and the threshold current, two microelectrodes penetrating the same cell were used.
After identifying the STN by microelectrode recording (MER), the DBS electrodes were implanted and connected to an implanted programmable generator.
The surface of the chip is covered with microelectrodes and the chip is connected to a power source, with the power converted to high-frequency sound waves.
To this end, arrays of microelectrodes are of interest [3] because of the much larger current signals attainable with these arrays compared to those with single electrodes [4, 5] and because these arrays can be incorporated within analytical microsystems (biochips) [6].