microinjection

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microinjection

[¦mī·krō·in′jek·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
Injection of cells with solutions by using a micropipet.
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) suggested that the H4 receptor subtype did not play a prominent role in the histaminergic modulation of memory processes; however, a recent study performed in our laboratory (7) showed that intravermis microinjections of VUF-8430 induced a deficit in memory consolidation in mice subjected to the EPM and IAT tests.
Shiny, "Therapeutic efficacy and safety of oral tranexamic acid and that of tranexamic acid local infiltration with microinjections in patients with melasma: a comparative study," Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, vol.
(17) In addition, a microinjection of acetylcholine caused a depressor effect with no significant effects on heart rate.
This effect was not seen in the animals that received microinjections into the left POA-AHA region.
Treatment started at 2 hours after ET-1 microinjections. Subsequent doses of minocycline (25 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered once a day for the next 4 days, and animals were perfused at 7 days poststroke.
The statistical significance of changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or heart rate (HR) after microinjections was determined within each group by Student's paired 1-test.
The microinjections were carried out at the end of the behavioral experiments.
Animal data support the hypothesis that microinjections of AM in the area postrema produce significant blood pressure and heart-rate changes, suggesting an involvement of AM in cardiovascular regulation (11-13).
Carbachol microinjections in the mediodorsal pontine tegmentum are unable to induce paradoxical sleep after caudal pontine and prebulbar transections in the cat.
The cells are then injected into the patient's spinal cord at the lesion area through 20-40 microinjections. Cumulatively, about two milliliters of the stem-cell preparation, corresponding to about 10-20 million cells, are injected above, below, and around the injury site using an insulin needle.
Three weeks before she sought treatment, the patient reported receiving multiple intradermal microinjections in her face and neck for cosmetic purposes (mesotherapy) with an unlicensed product consisting of a solution of glycosaminoglycans.
Microinjections. Brevetoxin congeners PbTx-1 and PbTx-3 (Calbiochem, La Jolla, CA) were dissolved in methanol and then added to triolein oil.