micromachine


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micromachine

[′mī·krō·mə‚shēn]
(materials)
A micrometer-size mechanical device; compared with an integrated circuit, it has some mechanical parts that stand above the substrate or move freely over it.

micromachine

A MEMS device, which is measured in micrometers. See MEMS.


A Bunch of Micromachines
Microfabrica's EFAB system was the first MEMS foundry process to accept CAD files as input, turning customer designs into micromachines much faster than traditional methods. EFAB builds the devices one metal layer at a time. In this image, the square at the top is a microfluidics device with internal passageways used for a "lab on a chip." The multi-arm device (center) is a fuel injection nozzle. Bottom left is an accelerometer (C-shaped wings), and bottom right is an inductor used in RF circuits. (Image courtesy of Microfabrica Inc., www.microfabrica.com)
References in periodicals archive ?
In light of these path-breaking developments, it is only appropriate that we are hosting this edition of the World Micromachine Summit, which will once again turn the global spotlight on Ras Al Khaimah and reaffirm our ongoing commitment to a sustainable future," said Sheikh Saud.
Slow and weak, the rotors circle at about twice the speed of the second hand on a watch and generate only a ten-thousandth as much torque as typical electrically powered micromachines do.
But he says his initial NASA brief to design a muscle-powered micromachine to repair spacecraft punctures is still several decades away.
Designers draw a picture of the micromachine part on a light mask (like a transparency), which acts like a photographic negative.
The development of tiny "micromachines" in Japan has brought the fantasy of Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage one step closer to reality.
The research suggests a way for engineers to power and control micromachines implanted in the human body or other fluid-filled environments.
The work was reported in the March issue of the Journal of Micromachines and Microengineering.
However, transferring fully developed muscles from an organism to a micromachine is impractical, notes Xi.
The new micromachine, a variable-reluctance motor suspended by gimbal springs, moves a data recording read-write head through a range of [+ or -]10 microns just above the surface of a spinning data storage disk and positions it to submicron accuracy.
Such a fully developed micromachine is at least five to 10 years away, according to Paul McWhorter, manager of the silicon technologies department at Sandia.
A MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN MICROMACHINE has been developed for use where popular electrostatically driven actuators fall short.