micronutrient

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micronutrient

[¦mī·krō′nü·trē·ənt]
(biochemistry)
An element required by animals or plants in small amounts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study suggests that measures to combat macroas well as micronutrient malnutrition (vitamin A deficiency, anemia as well as vitamin B-complex deficiency) need to be initiated immediately as acute malnutrition may hamper both growth as well as development in these tribal adolescents, The mid-day meal program supported by the Government of India needs to be strengthened using non-pharmacological measures such as behavior change communication, positive deviance and understanding the knowledge attitude, and practices of the grass root level workers associated with it.
Biofortification is one solution that can significantly reduce the scourge of micronutrient malnutrition. There is potential to increase micronutrient density of staple foods by breeding.
Micronutrient malnutrition has affected more than 3 billion people due to utilizing cereal based diet poor in vitamins and minerals.
I feel fortunate to have a "dream job" where I see patients as a pediatric hospitalist at Children's Hospital of Atlanta, direct a newly formed global health track for Emory pediatrics residents, teach a graduate course in global micronutrient malnutrition at Emory, and conduct international micronutrient research at the CDC.
Growth--whether driven by the agriculture or non-agriculture sectors--is insufficient to address child malnutrition and reduce micronutrient malnutrition. Strategic investments and special programmes are needed in the complementary sectors of health and education.
Relative to other approaches, fortification is thought to be the most cost effective means of overcoming micronutrient malnutrition.
In addition to working with food and beverage manufacturers throughout the world, Fortitech is taking a proactive stance to dramatically decrease the number of people affected by micronutrient malnutrition through the company's newest business unit, the World Initiative for Nutrition (WIN).
For every person saved from malnutrition through climate policies, the same money could have saved half a million people from micronutrient malnutrition through direct policies.
Compare this to the investments to tackle climate change -- $40 trillion annually by the end of the century -- which would save a hundred times fewer starving people (and in 90 years!) For every person saved from malnutrition through climate policies, the same money could have saved half a million people from micronutrient malnutrition through direct policies.
The guidelines are written from a nutrition and public health perspective, and will be used by nutrition-related public health program managers, particularly in developing countries, and by all those working to control micronutrient malnutrition, including scientists, technologists, and those in the food industry.