rapid prototyping

(redirected from Microstereolithography)

rapid prototyping

[¦rap·əd ′prōd·ə‚tīp·iŋ]
(industrial engineering)
A modeling process used in product design in which a CAD drawing of a part is processed to create a file of the part in slices, and then a part is built by depositing layer (slice) upon layer of material; includes stereolithography, selective laser sintering, or fused deposition modeling.

rapid prototyping

(programming)
The creation of a working model of a software module to demonstrate the feasibility of the function. The prototype is later refined for inclusion in a final product.

rapid prototyping

Building a part one layer at a time using a method of additive fabrication such as 3D printing. Such parts are used for concept modeling to determine if the product design meets the customer's expectations. The parts are also used for form, fit and function to make sure they work properly with other parts. Contrast with rapid manufacturing. See 3D printing. See also RAD.
References in periodicals archive ?
Delhote et al., "Fabrication of millimeter wave components via ceramic stereo- and microstereolithography processes," Journal of the American Ceramic Society, vol.
Zhang, "Projection microstereolithography using digital micro-mirror dynamic mask," Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, vol.
To print shape-memory structures with even finer details, Fang and his colleagues used a 3-D printing process they have pioneered, called microstereolithography, in which they use light from a projector to print patterns on successive layers of resin.
The SLA3500 system available at the UPM Product Development Laboratory allows us to manufacture details down to about 150 [micro]m, although more recent studies on the development of microstereolithography are gradually increasing its precision to submicrometric scales (NanoScribe GmbH), in spite of greatly limiting final part size to only a few [mm.sup.3].
Wicker, "Multi-material microstereolithography," The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Vol.
The study authors made a disc of biodegradable material which can be fixed over the cornea using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning.
Using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning, the researchers are able to make a disc of biodegradable material, which can be fixed over the cornea.
Microstereolithography, a rapid prototyping process originally developed 15 years ago at Japan's Nagoya University, now generates layers only 200 nanometers thick.
Structures made with digital light processing and microstereolithography and rapid prototyping based on two-photon absorption photopolymerization techniques are presented.
Matsuda, "Photo-polymerized microarchitectural constructs prepared by microstereolithography ([mu]SL) using liquid acrylate-end-capped trimethylene carbonate-based prepolymers," Biomaterials, vol.
Sun's tiny, prism-shaped cloaking structure, less than 10 millimetres long, was created using a technique called electronic transfer microstereolithography, where researchers use a data projector to project an image on a liquid polymer, then use light to transform the liquid layer into a thin solid layer.
Meanwhile, research that began in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Pennsylvania State University is extending the range of material options for MEMS made by a process known as microstereolithography. In a paper presented last fall at the Mechanical Engineering Congress in Nashville, the authors described 3-D ceramic structures with thicknesses of 50 microns to a millimeter, created by applying layer on layer of alumina ranging in thickness from 10 to 20 microns.