Middle English


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Middle English

the English language from about 1100 to about 1450: main dialects are Kentish, Southwestern (West Saxon), East Midland (which replaced West Saxon as the chief literary form and developed into Modern English), West Midland, and Northern (from which the Scots of Lowland Scotland and other modern dialects developed)
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Regarding the function of the investigated lexemes, all of them except for twen(e) could generally be used as both prepositions and adverbs in Middle English. Twen(e) is recorded exclusively as a preposition.
Edwards's "Towards a Taxonomy of Middle English Manuscript Assemblages," which problematizes previous attempts to categorize Middle English manuscripts.
Cervone's study, rather than focusing on how various Middle English authors represented affective or empathetic identification with scenes of Christ's Passion, investigates how they used poetic form to explore the scriptural metaphor of the Incarnation--the 'Word made flesh'--a figurative expression which holds both literal and symbolic meanings in suspense.
Mills has a tough assignment to carry out, since he has only eight pages to present a conspectus of the morphology of the over 90 manuscripts containing Middle English romances (cf.
(8) Alternatively, myhte in the passage in the Peterborough Chronicle might be regarded as impersonal, so that "aeuric man other be over myhte" might be rendered "everyone else whom in addition it was possible (to rob)." (9) The postpositive use of other, it should be added, is by no means very common in early Middle English, but it does occur, as in this example from Lazamon's Brut: "he uerde mid [thorn]an kinge.
The Middle English verb cakken with the same meaning may also refer to fouling one's breeches (see MED cakken v.).
He devises a typology of prologues to Old and Middle English poems (chapters two and four, respectively), identifying four main types for Old English verse (53) and another four for Middle English (108).
Erik Kooper exhaustively analyses the work of a copyist and/or adaptor who drastically abridged one version of Robert of Gloucester's Chronicle; Andrew Prescott and Raluca Radulescu both write on the Middle English Prose Brut, the former on its influential treatment of the Peasants' Revolt and the latter on the manuscript tradition; Julia Boffey speculates on the possible different audiences for Robert Fabian's two chronicles.
The latter of these two modes are investigated, respectively, in chapter 3 ("The Origins of the Alliterative Revival") and chapter 4 ("The Fourteenth-Century Meter"), which together discuss the tradition of Middle English alliterative verse.
A previous quantitative study of Jespersen's Cycle, Wallage (2005, 2008), documented the chronological spread of stage III during the Middle English period in detail, but was not able to address this question, noting that the resource he was using, the Penn Parsed Corpus of Middle English (PPCME2; Kroch & Taylor 2000), was not well balanced for dialect during the crucial period 1250-1350 CE (2005: 68, 205).
Three texts look at incorporation of earlier preconceptions into Middle English literature.
The name is from the middle English word stille - meaning silently, meekly, secretly - paired with go.

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