Middle High German


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to Middle High German: Middle Low German

Middle High German

High German from about 1200 to about 1500
References in periodicals archive ?
Lawson), 'Middle High German' (Frank Tobin), 'Late Middle High German, Renaissance and Reformation' (Albrecht Classen), 'Baroque' (Judith Aikin), 'Enlightenment' (John Van Cleve), 'Storm and Stress' (Kim Vivian), 'Classicism' (Gabrielle Bersier), 'Romanticism' (Christopher R.
Medieval monks were also fond of acrostics, as were the poets of the Middle High German and Italian Renaissance periods.
For this purpose he spent two years learning Frisian, also acquiring Old and Middle English, Old and Middle High German, and Gothic.
The volume is well and smoothly translated and, despite Latin, Middle High German, and Medieval French, remarkably free of misprints.
My first reaction, upon noting its left and its wide, creamy margins and delicate pages of 1,473 them, filled with stately columns of poetry and prose in ancient Greek and Latin, Old English, Old French, Icelandic, Middle English, Middle High German, medieval Latin and Italian, ProvenCal, Portuguese and Spanish, followed by their translations-was that the book was so well crafted and so exceptional in its contents that it must surely be out of print.
A Middle High German epic poem in four - line stanzas.
The texts examined were originally written in Medieval Latin, Medieval French, Middle English, Middle Scots, Middle High German, and Early Modern English.
It is this section in particular that bears mention, as it enables both students and scholars with little or no familiarity with Middle High German access to the 'remarkable visual program' (p.
This engaging and highly readable monograph addresses the presentation of (problematic) family relationships in Middle High German literature, focusing particularly on the ways in which this is conditioned by tensions between secular and religious narrative paradigms.
The texts from the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and the early FRG all share a disgust for foreign words, a romantic view of long-gone historical periods of German (in particular Old High German and Middle High German poetry), and a use of biological metaphors to describe the German language as strong, healthy, and blossoming and certain words of German as honest, beautiful, and juicy (saftig).
follows quotations from the Middle High German text with English translations specifically tailored to the point that Muller is making, rather than as passages in a translation of the entire text.
Behrens intersperses her text with the erotic Middle High German songs by Neidhart von Reuental and with Yiddish (for which a helpful glossary is provided), Ukrainian, and Turkish phrases.