Midland


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Midland,

town (1991 pop. 13,865), S Ont., Canada, on Georgian Bay, NW of Toronto. Midland is a port and has grain elevators and plants that manufacture textiles, cameras, optical goods, and other products. The Martyrs' Shrine, commemorating the deaths of five Jesuit priests who were among the eight North American martyrs canonized in 1930, and other remembrances of the early colonial period are nearby.

Midland.

1 City (1990 pop. 38,053), seat of Midland co., central Mich., in the Saginaw valley at the confluence of the Tittabawassee and Chippewa rivers; inc. 1887. Midland owes its development after 1890 to the Dow Chemical Company, whose corporate headquarters is there. Silicone products, chemicals, magnesium, and plastics are among the manufactures. Oil, coal, and salt are found in the area. The Dow Gardens Library and Center for Arts are in Midland, and Saginaw Valley State Univ. is in nearby University Center.

2 City (1990 pop. 89,443), seat of Midland co., W Tex., on the southern border of the Llano Estacado; inc. 1906. Midland has prospered partly because of its cattle ranches, but the city's reputation for spectacular wealth and its great spurt in population after 1940 resulted from the drilling of oil. Midland sits in the heart of the Permian Basin "oil patch" and has thus attracted numerous oil-company offices to the city. However, the city's growth slowed in the latter part of the 20th cent. Prefabricated metal buildings, oil field and transportation equipment, and paving materials are manufactured, and there is gas processing. A symphony orchestra, a planetarium, and a petroleum museum and hall of fame are in the city.

Midland

 

a city in the northern USA, in the state of Michigan. Population 35,000 (1970). A major center of the chemical industry; the city also produces light and rare metals, cement, and equipment for the chemical industry. Oil and table salt are extracted near Midland.

midland

a. the central or inland part of a country
b. (as modifier): a midland region
References in periodicals archive ?
There has been a 'Ministerial Champion of the Midlands Engine' in the Cabinet since 2015, starting with Bromsgrove MP Sajid Javid, who was Business Secretary at the time.
The settlement resolves the States' investigation into Midland's collection and litigation practices.
He has worked for several reputable organizations, including Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Midland Memorial Hospital, and the US Army Reserve.
In January, the companies entered into a definitive agreement under which Midland will acquire Centrue for estimated total consideration of USD 175.1m, or USD 26.75 per share of Centrue common stock.
Headquartered in Effingham, Illinois, Midland States Bancorp, Inc.
Canon, an oil and gas attorney, was mayor of Midland from 2001 to 2008 and served on the city council before that.
The agreement provides for Midland to merge Heartland Bank into Midland States Bank and operate the acquired branches under the Midland brand.
Pekin Recycling, with around 10 employees, is expected to change its name to Midland Davis.
When a third party pays another's debt, the debtor is considered to have taxable income, so MAS One would have reported income when Midland repaid the bank.
In October, Dow named Greg Welsch leader of its paper pilot coater in Midland. "Pilot coating facilities like ours actually play a dual role," Welsch said.
Midland 99 is similar to Midland and Tifton 44 in morphology and growth habit.
Figures showed that the Midlands was getting less money for good causes than other parts of the country.