concussion

(redirected from Mild traumatic brain injury)
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concussion

a jarring of the brain, caused by a blow or a fall, usually resulting in loss of consciousness

concussion

[kən′kəsh·ən]
(engineering)
Shock waves in the air caused by an explosion underground or at the surface or by a heavy blow directly to the ground surface during excavation, quarrying, or blasting operations.
(medicine)
A state of shock following traumatic injury, especially cerebral trauma, in which there is temporary functional impairment without physical evidence of damage to impaired tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.
It may also have been beneficial to evaluate if the trauma core nurses had prior education on symptom assessment/brain rest guidelines and if they were knowledgeable of such resources as the AAAN and ARN (2011) practice guideline: "Care of the Patient With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.
6 percent lower in those who sustained a mild traumatic brain injury in the two years before cognitive testing and 15 percent lower in those who sustained at least two mild traumatic brain injuries after cognitive testing, compared with those who sustained no mild traumatic brain injury.
Neuroimaging studies are usually negative in patients with acquired mild traumatic brain injury.
Postconcussive symptom reporting among US combat veterans with mild traumatic brain injury from operation Iraqi freedom.
The effect of hyperbaric oxygen on symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury.
The book exclusively covers pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).
5, respectively), and while mild traumatic brain injury was most strongly associated with combat exposures (adjusted OR, 16.
In the development of the guideline, a computerized search of Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature was performed using mild head injury, mild traumatic brain injury, and concussion as keywords.
The results indicate a link between the acupressure treatments and enhanced cognitive function in study subjects with mild traumatic brain injury, or TBI.
Results from a survey of more than 2,000 soldiers who had served in Iraq suggest that the relationship between mild traumatic brain injury and physical health problems is largely mediated by the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression.