millipede

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millipede

(mĭl`əpēd'), elongated arthropod having many body segments and pairs of legs. Millipedes, sometimes termed thousand-legged worms, have two pairs of legs on each body segment except the first few and the last. Females in one Californian species, Illacme plenipes, typically have more 650 legs, but are only 1.3 in. (33 mm) long; the leggiest ever found (1926) had 750. The millipede body is nearly circular in cross section. Most temperate region millipedes are rather small and dull in appearance, but a few tropical species are brightly colored, and some reach 1 ft (30 cm) in length.

Millipedes do not have a poisonous bite, but many protect themselves by offensive odors produced by stink glands; some produce highly irritating compounds that can injure the skin or eyes of attackers; and some can roll up into a ball or spiral for protection. They are widely distributed in temperate and warmer regions, living in surface litter, under stones or logs, and in relatively humid surroundings. They feed mostly on decaying vegetation, although some will consume decaying animal food. Some species attack plant roots and cause crop damage.

Centipedescentipede,
common name for members of a single class, Chilopoda, of the phylum Arthropoda. Centipedes are the most familiar of the myriapodous arthropods, which consist of five groups of arthropods that had a separate origin from other arthropods.
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, with which millipedes are often confused, are carnivorous, have a single pair of legs on each segment, and a body that is flat in cross section. Millipedes belong to the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Diplopoda.

millipede

[′mil·ə‚pēd]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for members of the arthropod class Diplopoda.

millipede

, millepede, milleped
any terrestrial herbivorous arthropod of the class Diplopoda, having a cylindrical body made up of many segments, each of which bears two pairs of walking legs
References in periodicals archive ?
Marek runs the only lab in the United States that focuses on millipedes. In the last few years, he has discovered and named nine other species.
The leggy creature is one of the longest species of millipede in the world and its wild counterparts are usually found amongst rotten trees, leaf litter and fallen fruit.
Considering the urgent need for information on invertebrate diversity in southern Africa (Hamer & Slotow 2002), there is much to be gained by investigating intraspecific genetic variation in millipedes, because diversity data and correct identification of taxa have implications for biodiversity conservation and other disciplines.
"Millipedes are a factor we are going to take into account," said transport experts.
They also investigated compounds found in millipedes.
Morris is an eight-year-old millipede. His mother appears on Bee Bee Bee Television, his father is a policeman who locked up the Big Bad Bed Bug Brothers in Woodworm Scrubs prison Instead of doing something normal, like playing for the Earwig Rovers or the England Crickets team, Morris wants--desperately--to be a dancer, if possible on the same stage as the ballerina Dame Gossamer Spider.
LEGGING IT: Angel Bottomley of Grange Moor First School holds a millipede which was one of the insects brought in to school for one of their lessons Pictures by Andy Catchpool (AC280110Cmoor- DAY OF THE DRAGON: Jake Cockerham holds a bearded dragon which was one of the animals brought in to school for their lessons (AC280110Cmoor-01) CLOSE ENCOUNTERS: Grange Moor First School pupil Levi Wany holds a cockroach which was one of the insects brought in to school for one of their lessons (AC280110Cmoor-04)
Slugs, snails, harvestmen, worms, beetles, flies, ants, springtails, earwigs, spiders, mites, millipedes, centipedes and woodlice suddenly appear to be trapped and examined in magnifying jars.
The braver youngsters even got to grips with scary-looking mini-beasts including giant snails and millipedes.