Milton


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Milton: Milton Friedman

Milton,

town (1990 pop. 25,725), Norfolk co., E Mass., a residential suburb of Boston, on the Neponset River; settled 1636, set off from Dorchester and inc. 1662. Granite quarries are nearby. Milton is the seat of Curry College and several preparatory schools, including Milton Academy (1798). Harvard's meteorological observatory is on Blue Hill.

Milton

John. 1608--74, English poet. His early works, notably L'Allegro and Il Penseroso (1632), the masque Comus (1634), and the elegy Lycidas (1637), show the influence of his Christian humanist education and his love of Italian Renaissance poetry. A staunch Parliamentarian and opponent of episcopacy, he published many pamphlets during the Civil War period, including Areopagitica (1644), which advocated freedom of the press. His greatest works were the epic poems Paradise Lost (1667; 1674), and Paradise Regained (1671) and the verse drama Samson Agonistes (1671)
References in classic literature ?
It was during these early years spent at Horton, too, that Milton wrote his masque of Comus.
All these poems of which I have told you, Milton wrote during the quiet years spent at Horton.
When Milton returned home he did not go back to Horton, but set up house in London.
It is scarce to be imagined that a gawdy-day in which John Milton took part could have been very riotous.
Then after Milton had been leading this severe quiet life for about four years, a strange thing happened.
Milton had a friend to whose house he often went, and in this house his wife was hid one day when the poet came to pay a visit.
Brown's Milton on Film offers a readable and critically engaged historical analysis of the fascinating passage of Milton's poetry into film, a dual passage marked by the gap between 300 years of Miltonic adaptations and a successful feature-length production of Paradise Lost.
NASDAQ: OVBC), parent company of The Ohio Valley Bank Company, and Milton Bancorp, Inc.
John Leonard has written a reception history of Paradise Lost that offers a view of Milton aligned with a body of criticism that reached its apogee after the middle of the last century.
Abstract: Recent scholarship on John Milton argues that Milton rejected the popular Reformation understanding of Christ's atonement, the penal-substitutionary theory of atonement, and that Milton was uncomfortable with the Crucifixion of Jesus as God's means of human salvation.
It is understandable that scholars have heretofore overlooked Milton's influence because "Kant's engagement with Milton has only recently become more or less readily available.
Instead of putting John Milton in the context of his own time, David Hawkes proposes in this study to put him in the context of ours.