mineral dust


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mineral dust

A very finely divided mineral product, the greatest bulk of which will pass through a 74-micron (No. 200) sieve; the most common such material is pulverized limestone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The annual emissions of mineral dust from southern Africa are around 2,300 Mg (approximately 5% of the global annual emissions) and are on the same order of magnitude of those from major recognized sources in Arabia and the deserts of East Asia (Ginoux et al.
Mineral dust exposure in young Indian adults: an effect on lung growth?
McMeeking et al., "Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles," Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol.
Yes, you can reduce the number of spiders in your home by dusting crevices, corners and the spaces under beds and furniture with diatomaceous earth (DE)--a natural mineral dust with tiny, sharp particles.
carbon, mineral dust and water which were among the types of particles that
It was also suggested that operations that generate non-combustible dusts, such as mineral dust, also should be excluded.
For some types of aerosols -- including naturally occurring mineral dust particles -- it isn't clear how they might affect climate.
In fact, models of hot-planet atmospheres do predict that they should be full of black mineral dust.
Meskhidze examined how variations in air pollution and mineral dust affect iron mobilization.
The Factories Inspectorate reported in 1898 that "microscopic examination of this mineral dust shows the jagged nature of the particles and wherever they are allowed in this manner to remain suspended in the air, injury, more or less serious, ensues for the respiratory organs of the workers."