mini-supercomputer

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mini-supercomputer

[‚min·ē′sü·pər·kəm‚püd·ər]
(computer science)
A supercomputer that is about a quarter to a half as fast in vector processing as the most powerful supercomputers.

mini-supercomputer

A computer that is nearly as fast as a supercomputer but costs less. See supercomputer.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it stands, Oak Ridge uses parallel processing DataCube minisupercomputer boards on Sparcstation workstations to process the line scan data.
of Wisconsin's (Madison) Institute for Enzyme Research are using an x-ray crystallography software package running on a minisupercomputer to reduce the time required to create accurate models of complex protein structures.
Since last summer, the researchers have been running the simulation in real time by mounting it on an Alliant minisupercomputer, using vectorization and multiprocessing.
CALIFORNIA COMPACT...Computer scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz are in the midst of creating a minisupercomputer that will combine the ability to perform close to a billion calculations per second with the ease of a desk-top computer.
While markets for other high-performance computing (HPC) systems, including vector supercomputers and minisupercomputers, have declined, the market for MPP systems has been steadily increasing.
Facilities include more than 60 workstations, one 16-node nCUBE parallel computer, one 16-node Transputer, two CONVEX C120 minisupercomputers, and many PCs.
Yet these "minisupercomputers" usually cost much less than $1 million.
The University Computer Center has CONVEX C240 and C220 minisupercomputers which are accessible through FDDI campus network from all departments.
These machines would combine sonar with satellite positioning data - a job, according to Stewart, that would still require several Convex minisupercomputers. The dynamic positioning system for the mother ship already uses a miniature version of this technology, combining a subset of this data and displaying it to the operator graphically.
This system includes a Cray supercomputer, two Convex minisupercomputers, and more than 25 Sun workstations and file servers.
Parallel processing will find its way into minisupercomputers, and "as more and more firepower" is needed, McCormick says, they will also serve as local graphics and image processing machines.