semitone

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semitone

an interval corresponding to a frequency difference of 100 cents as measured in the system of equal temperament, and denoting the pitch difference between certain adjacent degrees of the diatonic scale (diatonic semitone) or between one note and its sharpened or flattened equivalent (chromatic semitone); minor second

Semitone

 

the smallest interval in European music. In the modern system of temperament, all semitones are equal, and there are 12 semitones in an octave.

There are three types of semitones: diatonic, chromatic, and enharmonic. The diatonic semitone is an interval between adjacent steps of a scale (for example, B to C, D to E flat [a minor second]). The chromatic semitone is the interval between a foundation and its raised or lowered variant (for example, F to F sharp, an augmented prime). The enharmonic semitone is the interval formed by the alteration of adjacent steps—for example, F double sharp to A flat, a double-diminished third (seeINTERVAL).

semitone

[′sem·i‚tōn]
(acoustics)
The interval between two sounds whose frequencies have a ratio approximately equal to the twelfth root of 2. Also known as half step.
References in periodicals archive ?
The conflict between the major and minor second is ultimately decided in favor of the major second.
stacks what it cannot fix a fever of water intact for minor seconds a
In "Waltz," repeated minor seconds punctuate the flow of the graceful tune, suggesting that one partner keeps stepping on the other's foot
Here Item 19 highlights the succession of minor seconds that represents the descending seventh motive of the opening music.
The tessitura of the horn part sits mostly on the treble staff until the last couple minutes of the work (the Agitato), during which three climaxes ascend to a"s and ab"s, and finally a b" in fast, demanding patterns of tongued sixteenths (major and minor seconds somewhat like the first etude of Verne Reynolds's 48 Etudes, but much faster), lending a powerful virtuosic finish to this interesting character piece reminiscent of classical saxophone solos by the composers of the Paris Conservatory.
The harmonists consider only non-harmonic major and minor seconds attacked by conjunct intervals as appoggiaturas; but singers should, I believe, besides these seconds, regard all the intervals which fulfill the same functions, such as the delayed notes and the disjunct intervals, as appoggiaturas and subject them to the same rules.
Minor seconds challenge the two porcupines dancing the polka.
The turning and floating away of the reflection of the moon in the water is pictured in delicate tremolos and a rising line of quarter notes in syncopation that end with a very soft sextuplet in minor seconds disappearing high on the keyboard.