Mirror Nuclei

mirror nuclei

[′mir·ər ′nü·klē‚ī]
(nuclear physics)
A pair of atomic nuclei, each of which would be transformed into the other by changing all its neutrons into protons, and vice versa.

Mirror Nuclei

 

a pair of nuclei that differ in that the number of neutrons in one of them is equal to the number of protons in the other, although the total number of neutrons and protons is equal. Examples of mirror nuclei are the nucleus of tritium JH, which contains one proton and two neutrons, and the nucleus He, which contains two protons and one neutron. Other examples are Mirror Nuclei

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References in periodicals archive ?
This will allow further investigation into the fundamental differences between nn and pp interactions through the comparison of mirror nuclei, in particular through mirror energy differences.
We consider mirror nuclei [sup.17]O and [sup.17]F isotopes with a single nucleon on top of the [sup.16]O and [sup.16]F isotopes core.
The ground state and first excited energies of mirror nuclei [sup.17]O and [sup.17]F isotopes are obtained in relativistic and nonrelativistic shell model by using (10) and (19), respectively.
The difference between excited state energies and ground state energies of mirror nuclei O and F isotopes for relativistic and nonrelativistic shell model is compared with the experimental data and others work in Table 2.
The results of the models for mirror nuclei are shown in Table 2, which is the analogous of Table 1.