Miskito

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Related to Miskito Indian: Mosquito Indians

Miskito

 

an Indian people living mainly in Nicaragua, with a small number in Honduras, and numbering 25,000 to 30,0(X) persons (1970, estimate). Their language belongs to the MiskitoMatagalpan language group. The Miskito, nominally Christians, have preserved their tribal beliefs. The chief occupations are hunting, fishing, farming (bananas, sweet potatoes, and, in some regions, rice and cotton), and gathering rubber. Some Miskito work for very low wages as hired laborers on plantations and in the lumber industry.

References in periodicals archive ?
The future 'routes' for the islands had already been laid: centuries of conflict amongst the British, their slaves, the Spanish (later Colombians and Nicaraguans), the Creole English-speaking community and the Miskito Indians.
In a windblown hamlet on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua Edward Marriott meets the Miskito Indians, who currently face economic hardship, and look back with fondness to the times when the British controlled the coast
After more than 100 years of control by non-Indigenous people (and little to show for it, except poverty and despair) the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua figured they'd try their luck with out-of-the-country Natives when they went shopping for consultants.
Two Miskito Indians from Nicaragua left so impressed that they asked the Indian coordinators of the Panama City meeting to assist them with a mapping effort of their own in December.
A few years after winning the peace prize, he set up the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity, which, in addition to Israeli and Jewish causes, campaigned for Miskito Indians in Nicaragua, Cambodian refugees, victims of South African apartheid and of famine and genocide in Africa.
Arguably the darkest chapter in their shared history were the events of December 1981-January 1982, when Sandinistas--in response to a contra operation dubbed Navidad roja (red Christmas) --are believed to have killed numerous Miskito Indians near the Honduran border and forced thousands into refugee camps (NotiCen, May 17, 2012).
Along the Atlantic seaboard, the Miskito Indians, who had regional autonomy until 1984 and have ever since resisted central jurisdiction, increased their resistance to the Sandinista regime.
While Campbell's interpretation of slave resistance is bound to be controversial, her focus on the depth and breadth of the Spanish presence in Belize and on the invaluable role of the Miskito Indians for the Baymen offers an important corrective to our understanding of Belizean history.
Unique in its coverage of the Spanish period of Belize's history, this book focuses on the alliance between British timber cutters and the Miskito Indians as they fought together against the Spanish during the Spanish period of Belize, 1528-1708.
In reality, the contribution (so to speak) of the Sandinistas was so noticeable in the area of land distribution (just to select one example among many) that even the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights denounced the forcible relocation and sheer deprivation of Miskito Indians at the hand of the Sandinistas.
Although the Miskito Indians had used Ojon oil for centuries to condition and protect their hair and skin, it had never been exported.
US, Honduran and Nicaraguan soldiers searched remote jungle beaches and the open sea for survivors and bodies after Hurricane Felix claimed at least 98 lives, many of them Miskito Indians who died fleeing the Category 5 storm.