Miskito

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Related to Miskito Indians: Mosquito Indians

Miskito

 

an Indian people living mainly in Nicaragua, with a small number in Honduras, and numbering 25,000 to 30,0(X) persons (1970, estimate). Their language belongs to the MiskitoMatagalpan language group. The Miskito, nominally Christians, have preserved their tribal beliefs. The chief occupations are hunting, fishing, farming (bananas, sweet potatoes, and, in some regions, rice and cotton), and gathering rubber. Some Miskito work for very low wages as hired laborers on plantations and in the lumber industry.

References in periodicals archive ?
They told him the Miskito Indians are referred to in their native language as Tawira, which translates to "the people of beautiful hair.
These were all nominally under Spanish jurisdiction, but allied with the Miskito Indians, the British did as they willed.
Ojon Restorative Hair Treatment is an updated version of a traditional hair treatment developed more than 500 years ago by the Miskito Indians.
Most of the harvesting is done along the impoverished eastern coast where thousands of Miskito Indians make their living on the water.
Using passages from Wiesel's own ever-developing autobiographical writings (in particular, from the mid-sixties on), speech excerpts, and segments from his own single brief personal meeting with Wiesel, Chmiel observes Wiesel's response to a number of sociopolitical and historical issues, including the third Arab-Israeli War (1967) and his now famous response to Charles DeGualle's stance toward Israel, his interventions on behalf of suffering refugees in Southeast Asia, his very public and highly eloquent speeches on the starving children of Biafra, his work with the suffering Miskito Indians in Nicaraguara and on until his involvement with the Clinton administration and the Kosovo conflict.
These are the people whose "victimhood" is honored by the powers that be--Soviet Jews, Miskito Indians in Nicaragua, etc.
In a windblown hamlet on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua Edward Marriott meets the Miskito Indians, who currently face economic hardship, and look back with fondness to the times when the British controlled the coast
On 21 February 1981 the armed forces killed seven Miskito Indians and wounded seventeen others.
Even in Nicaragua, where Le livre noir allows slight--very slight--mitigation of the Sandinista regime, genocide was committed against the Miskito Indians, and no effort was spared to lower other opponents to a status below that of normal humanity.
In the middle, armed by the CIA, were the Miskito Indians, who had agreed to fight the Sandinistas only because they were caught between the two Nicaraguan factions.
After more than 100 years of control by non-Indigenous people (and little to show for it, except poverty and despair) the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua figured they'd try their luck with out-of-the-country Natives when they went shopping for consultants.
Between 1982 and 1983, by invitation of Nicaragua's Sandinista government, the ICHR intervened to promote the adoption of a special statute guaranteeing measures of self-government for the Miskito Indians of the Atlantic Coast.