Miskito

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Miskito

 

an Indian people living mainly in Nicaragua, with a small number in Honduras, and numbering 25,000 to 30,0(X) persons (1970, estimate). Their language belongs to the MiskitoMatagalpan language group. The Miskito, nominally Christians, have preserved their tribal beliefs. The chief occupations are hunting, fishing, farming (bananas, sweet potatoes, and, in some regions, rice and cotton), and gathering rubber. Some Miskito work for very low wages as hired laborers on plantations and in the lumber industry.

References in periodicals archive ?
They thought they could jump into socialism in two years; they thought the Miskito Indians were going to be proletarians.' Many within the government agree, though they explain that having inherited a country in rubble, with U.S.
One morning during my first week in Nicaragua a woman from the government press office, which the Sandinistas have shrewdly located, like a fishnet, in the Intercontinental, asked if I would go to the East Coast the following day with the 300 Miskito Indians who were being repatriated.
Causa has also quietly helped Misura, the rebel army of Miskito Indians based in Honduras and backed by the Central Intelligence Agency until the cutoff.
Interviews with a dozen persons involved with or close to the "Panamanian contras" reveal that there are at least four groups, made up mostly of Miskito Indians and blacks from Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast and former members of the Panamanian Defense Forces (P.D.F.).
In another such case, the Reagan Administration, so as to justify armed intervention by the contras, accused the Sandinistas of "slaughtering thousands" of Miskito Indians. Indeed, there were severe abuses by the Sandinistas, but they never approached the level claimed by the propagandists.
Q: Some Miskito Indians from Nicaragua's Atlantic coast say you supported the Sandinista government against them in the 1980s.
They -- rightly -- condemned them for human rights violations against the Miskito Indians on Nicaragua's east coast, but were silent about contra atrocities against civilians.
Its massive storm surge could devastate Indian communities along the Miskito Coast, an isolated region straddling the Honduras-Nicaragua border where Miskito Indians live in wooden shacks, get around on canoes and subsist on fish, beans, rice, cassava and plantains.
Scores of Miskito Indians have been killed or paralyzed from diving accidents, Nietschmann says.
Two Miskito Indians from Nicaragua left so impressed that they asked the Indian coordinators of the Panama City meeting to assist them with a mapping effort of their own in December.
This point is made again in the next chapter, a review of Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz's Indians of the Americans, in which Churchill takes Ortiz to task for the quality of her defense of Nicaragua's Sandinista government's treatment of the Atlantic Coast Miskito Indians. In this essay Churchill shows an evenhandedness by his willingness to level his criticisms at both Indian and non-Indian authors alike.
Sandinista authorities forced thousands of Miskito Indians living near the Honduran border in northeastern Nicaragua into refugee camps.