Mitchell, William

Mitchell, William

(Billy Mitchell), 1879–1936, American army officer and pilot, b. Nice, France. He enlisted (1898) in the U.S. army in the Spanish-American War and received a commission in the regular army in 1901, serving with the signal corps. Rising during World War I to the rank of brigadier general, he organized and ably commanded the American expeditionary air force. After the war, he became assistant chief of air service in the U.S. army, and, as an advocate of airpower, argued vehemently for a large independent air force. He urged the military potential of strategic bombing, airborne forces, and polar air routes, and created a national issue when, to demonstrate the superiority of airpower, he directed the sensational sinking (1921–23) of several warships in prearranged tests. However, his sharp public criticisms of military leaders for neglect of airpower led to his court martial (1925); he was sentenced to a five-year suspension from duty and forfeiture of pay, but resigned (1926) from the army. He continued to promote airpower as a civilian, but not until World War II were his main ideas adopted. Mitchell's writings include Winged Defense (1925) and Skyways (1930).

Bibliography

See biographies by I. D. Levine (1943, repr. 1972), R. Burlingame (1952), and A. F. Hurley (1964); B. Davis, The Billy Mitchell Affair (1967).

Mitchell, William

(1945–2010)
An architect and urban theorist who founded and led the Smart Cities research group at the MIT Media Lab and oversaw a building campaign on the campus. The project included five buildings: Frank Gehry’s Stata Center, Kevin Roche’s Sports and Fitness Center, Steven Holl’s Simmons Hall, Charles Correa’s Brain and Cognitive Sciences Complex, and Fumihiko Maki’s Media Lab Complex. His many books include Reinventing the Automobile (2010), with Christopher Borroni-Bird and Lawrence Burns; World’s Greatest Architect: Making, Meaning and Network Culture (2008); and his seminal work, Computer-Aided Architectural Design (1977).

Mitchell, (William) “Billy”

(1879–1936) aviation pioneer; born in Nice, France. Son of a U.S. senator, he grew up in Milwaukee, enlisted for service in the Spanish-American War and received a Signal Corps commission in 1901. Assigned to the aviation section in 1916, Mitchell learned to fly the following year and immediately became a forceful and outspoken advocate of military air power. In France in September 1918, he commanded the largest concentration of aircraft—some 1,500 warplanes—in aviation's brief history. In 1921 and 1923 the energetic Mitchell arranged for aircraft to demonstrate the potential of the new arm by sinking obsolete warships at sea; unconvinced, the authorities continued to grade air power low on the priority list. Mitchell provoked a court-martial by his continuing and insistent criticism of his superiors, whom he accused of negligence and even treason. Convicted of insubordination, he resigned from the army in February 1926. As a civilian, he continued to promote his vision of air power's importance in warfare. World War II brought him full posthumous vindication.
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Honorees, by county, are: Bolivar County: Indira Black; Washington County: Steele Davis, Steven King Sylvester Davis, Robert Cosey; Humphreys County: Eric Hill, Floyd Merritt; Holmes County: Lester Young Sharkey County: Kelvin Johnson, Sylvester Pinkins, John Crawford; Yazoo County: Wade Yeates, Don McGraw, Rachel Carr, Eddie Kirkland, Billy Davis, Andrew Ross, Robert Mitchell, William Small, John Milner, Fred Stuckey; Claiborne County: David Berry; Warren County: Lemar Davis; Hinds County: Roy Anderson, Val DeVellis; Madison County: Daniel Cauthen.
Ushers were David Scott Mays, Shane Anthony Mitchell, William Stephen Taunton, and Frank Henry White.
Cathy Williams, Catherine Mitchell, William Dunbabin and Christopher Smith have all admitted conspiracy to defraud between September 2005 andMarch 2006.
Sandy Mitchell, William Sampson and five other men were accused of fighting a turf-war over the banned alcohol trade.
Sandy Mitchell, William Sampson and four other Britons were freed by the Saudi king.
(6.) Mitchell, William J., e-topio: Urban Life, Jim - but not on we know it, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass and London.
Mitchell, William, Our Air Force, the Keystone of National Defense.
prelim 4 senior: 1, c Rowell, Murphy, 63.6; 2, Lesley Dawson, Dene Palmy, 63.1; 3, Mandy Craig, The Vanliner, 59; 4, Mandy Craig, Amber Silk, 58.1; 5, John Faulder, Charlie, 57.7; 6, Sherri Took, Lakewood Spring Time, 55; JUNIOR: 1, Natasha Burrows, Wexford Boy, 66.3; 2, Jade Manual, Tsar, 65.9; 3, Poppy Mitchell, William, 63.6; 4, Ami Miller, Nerwyn Endor, 63.6.
Ashley Bancstock was advised by Southard Financial, LLC and the law firm of Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates and Woodyard, P.L.L.C.
Recognizing the confusion and uncertainties the new law has caused throughout the business community, we at Arkansas Business, in cooperation with Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, are presenting our Health Care Reform Symposium along with this special supplement.
NUNEATON BOROUGH (from): MacKenzie, Simpson, Love, Weaver, Angus, Crowley, Sykes, Wray, Williams (B), Charles, King, Taylor, Bacon, Francis, Mitchell, Williams (J), Young.
The Terriers saw Mitchell, Williams and Wildgoose on the score sheet to cap a great team display, Fatfield's Norton responding.