miscegenation

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miscegenation

interbreeding of races, esp where differences of pigmentation are involved

Miscegenation

 

the mixing of human races. The offspring of these mixed marriages are called half-breeds.

Racial mixing has always taken place in regions where various racial groups have been in contact with one another. The scale of such crossing grew considerably after the great geographical discoveries of the 15th to 17th centuries and the subsequent colonial expansion and slave trading. It is a natural phenomenon in human history and proves the untenability of the reactionary theory of polygenism (the theory of the origin of the principal races of mankind from different ancestors, thereby ascribing Caucasoids, Mongoloids, and Negroids to separate species). The same capacity of half-breeds for reproduction as is found in intraracial unions—not the case between different species—is the most convincing proof of the species unity of mankind and the close kinship of all human races.

miscegenation

[mi‚sej·ə′nā·shən]
(anthropology)
Intermarriage between different races.
References in periodicals archive ?
Powell explained, "When we say mixed blood Indian we mean that there has been some white blood or other blood mixed with the Chippewa blood?"
"For many Indians whose thoughts fastened on their next meal instead of advantageous real estate transactions," Meyer writes, "the promise of immediate cash was seductive." (46) Thus many Anishinaabeg simply called themselves "mixed blood" to gain control of their land.
The acceptance of this illegal miscegenation meant that 'in 1860 the percentage of mixed bloods in New Orleans was 48.9, while it was 11.0 in the rest of the State'.
Erkkila, in Mixed Blood and Other Crosses, is interested in many of the same issues, authors, and texts as Coviello, and even more aggressively asserts their complicity in establishing a nefarious white male patriarchy.
To intermix with our white brothers; Indian mixed bloods in the United States from the earliest times to the Indian removals.
They form part of a personal story included in "Real" Indians and Others: Mixed Blood Urban Native Peoples and Indigenous Nationhood, a study by Dr.
Prior to Knox's order, the Marine Corps followed the Navy's regulations banning African-Americans and those with mixed blood as "persons whose characters are suspicious." It was President Roosevelt who ordered the ban be lifted, a little bit at a time.
This news shatters the young girl, and she becomes obsessed with the fact that she is of mixed blood, although she is so fair that no one could ever surmise her ethnicity.
It suggests the Spaniards, rather than obliterating or sweeping aside the natives, mingled with them, thus creating a population of mixed blood and cultures.
Acadians were of mixed blood and their refusal to swear allegiance to English or French monarchs lead to their dispersal in the Maritimes and Louisiana.
Newspaper print, the truth, racism, Max's mixed blood despite the title, nothing here is entirely black and white.
The children are taken because they are mixed blood with white fathers and aboriginal mothers.