Moab

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Moab

(mō`ăb), ancient nation located in the uplands E of the Dead Sea, now part of Jordan. The area is unprotected from the east, hence its history is a chain of raids by the Bedouin. The Moabites were close kin to the Hebrews, and the language of the Moabite stoneMoabite stone
, ancient slab of stone erected in 850 B.C. by King Mesha of Moab; it contains a long inscription commemorating a victory in his revolt against Israel. It was discovered at Dibon, Jordan (1868), by F. A. Klein, a German clergyman.
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 is practically the same as biblical Hebrew. The relations of Moab with Judah and Israel are continually mentioned in the Bible. As a political entity, Moab came to an end after the invasion (c.733 B.C.) of Tiglathpileser IIITiglathpileser III,
d. 728 B.C., king of ancient Assyria. He seems to have usurped the throne in 745 B.C. He bore the alternative name of Pul, by which he was known in biblical history (2 Kings 15.19).
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. Its people were later absorbed by the Nabataeans. The Moabite religion was much like that of Canaan. Archaeological exploration in Moab has shown that settlements first occurred in the 13th cent. B.C.

Moab

 

the ancient state of the Moabites, one of the tribes of Canaan.

Moab is believed to have arisen in the second half of the second millennium B.C. on the east bank of the Jordan River and the shore of the Dead Sea. For several centuries Moab carried on a struggle with the states of Palestine and southern Syria. In the llth and tenth centuries B.C., Moab evidently formed part of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the ninth century B.C., it became politically independent. The most prolonged wars were carried on by King Mesha (ninth century B.C.), who expanded the territory of the state significantly. In the second half of the eighth century B.C., Moab came under the control of Assyria. (Moab is repeatedly mentioned in cuneiform sources.)

Of the pantheon of Moabite gods, the supreme god, Chemosh, and one of his hypostases, Ashtar-Chemosh, are well known. The Moabites wrote with the Phoenician script and were noticeably influenced by Phoenician culture.

Moab

Old Testament an ancient kingdom east of the Dead Sea, in what is now the SW part of Jordan: flourished mainly from the 9th to the 6th centuries bc
References in periodicals archive ?
Burnett, "Transjordan: The Ammonites, Moabites, and Edomites," weaves a coherent picture of these three Transjordanian people groups, focusing on the myriad of inscriptions found in each of these West Semitic states.
the emir] requested the assistance of those of Tingitana, and an immeasurable number of Moabites joined the expedition.
Because of a famine, Elimelech and his wife Naomi and their two sons journey from Bethlehem to Moab, where the two sons marry Moabite girls named Orpah and Ruth.
His own ancestress Ruth was a Moabite. His son Solomon [Sulayman (AS)], who succeeded the throne, was born of a Hittite mother.
Beginning with exegesis in Ruth, Jones looks at characterization in the Old Testament book, such as Moab and Moabites, on the road back to Bethlehem, and damning with faint praise.
From this passage, it seems that the Moabites originally lived on both sides of the Arnon River.
Ancient Israelites understood their generational struggles against their enemies, especially the Ammonites, Moabites and Edomites.
Whatever this narrative's relationship to other passages dealing with Moabites, at least in the world of this book, ethnic boundaries have changed.
He proceeded to tell a small crowd of African-Americans that they were members of the lost race of Moabites, who had been driven from the Land of Canaan by Joshua and forced to settle in northwest and southwest Africa, where, in time, they became castigated as "negroes" and "blacks." He sold them new identity cards and copies of a pamphlet called "The Circle of Seven Koran," which purportedly was a clandestine version of the holy book of Islam.
Firstly, out of all the tribes that used to live in the land (Moabites, Ammonites, Hivites, etc.) just one is left.
Koosed compellingly challenges the assumption of most interpreters that the story of Lot's daughters in Genesis and the anti-Moabite law of Deuteronomy demonstrate the existence of an anti-Moabite attitude on the part of the Bethlehemites in the story and the book's earliest "readers." However, it was unclear to me why the historical argument about the relationship between Deuteronomy and Ruth led Koosed to question the status of Moabites in the community (33), but not the existence of gleaning as a "right under the law" (76).
Ruth's decision, unlike that of her sister Orpah, who chooses to turn back to the god of the Moabites, is to follow the one true God, Yahweh, the God of Israel.