Moby Dick

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Moby Dick

pursued by Ahab and crew of Pequod. [Am. Lit.: Moby Dick]
See: Quarry

Moby Dick

white whale pursued relentlessly by Captain Ahab; “It was the whiteness of the whale that above all things appalled me.” [Am. Lit.: Moby Dick]
References in periodicals archive ?
Moby-Dick (1851), in which Ishmael, the narrator, joins the monomaniacal Captain Ahab aboard the Pequod in a doomed quest to vanquish the titular whale, has given rise to numerous visual interpretations, with illustrators and painters drawn to the novel's mix of nautical derring-do and philosophical profundity.
By another, one of Dar-yoush's business partners was reading Herman Melville's classic novel "Moby-Dick" when they opened the original location.
ABSTRACT: Despite Conrad's aesthetic disapproval of Melville, he nevertheless retained key elements of Moby-Dick in Heart of Darkness: the pattern of the plot--a first person narrator who survives to tell the tale; a doomed and depraved central character--Ahab the pursuer and Kurtz the object of pursuit; a wild, untamed setting--the vast ocean and ungovernable jungle; the confinement of the whaling ship and the decrepit river steamer.
LAHORE:In 1850, when Herman Melville was writing Moby-Dick, America was facing a crisis: there was both a war between races, and a war of race.
What is the pertinence of Moby-Dick (1850) for the narrative technique, political concerns, and lingering guilt of Arthur Koestler (1905-1983), a reformed Communist Party member and Hungarian-British novelist who was also a reporter, historian, and autobiographer?
Michael Strelow; THE MOBY-DICK BLUES; Roundfire Books (Children's: Young Adult Fiction) 14.95 ISBN: 9781785357015
Melville's imagination both in Moby-Dick and much of the other
Melville in Love: The Secret Life of Herman Melville and the Muse of Moby-Dick. By Michael Shelden.
Mailer's exploitation of Moby-Dick in all of his fiction,
The Essex and the Whale: Melville's Leviathan Library and the Birth of Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick does not contain the word "fiction" much less "American classic." But search engines these days are smarter than that; if you search Google for "'American classic' fiction whale," Moby-Dick is the first result.