Sabellianism

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Sabellianism

3rd-century Christian heresy led by Sabellius. [Christian Hist.: EB, VIII: 747]
References in periodicals archive ?
Nor ought any exposition be made of them for the reason and consideration that they are not contained in the divine Scriptures." (28) Although the creed's authors (Valens, Ursacius, and Germinius) frame this rejection in terms of the now contemporary struggle, that is, they are rejecting the theologies of the Nicenes and Basil of Ancyra and the Homoiousians, the larger context is their overriding concern about modalism. The creed begins with a short affirmation of the God's "oneness," but it then moves to a rather strong statement denying that there are two Gods.
Recently, however, there has been a revival of modalism, which Tertullian associates with the seeds previously sown by Praxeas.
What is the relation between the principle-based conception and what is sometimes called "modalism"?
Classical modalism about essence is the view that essence can be analyzed in modal terms.
maintains a solid stance against modalism, he does not address the threat of tritheism, the Scylla to modalism's Charybdis.
They reject modalism and affirm that the Father, Son, and Spirit are persons.
One gets the impression that an undercurrent of Leithart's book is a careful desire to avoid engaging the discussion of modalism, which lies just under the surface of the Arian controversy.
The early doctrine of the Trinity (chapter II), as he shows, keeps the balance between modalism (Father, Son and Spirit as a static unit) on the one hand and subordinatianism (Son and Holy Spirit are subordinated to the Father).
Although he makes a passing reference to Sabellianism, he offers no discussion of second-century views of adoptionism or modalism. Moreover, Hall's treatment of Arius's theology does not provide an explanation of why Arius and his followers denied the divinity of the Son.
(52) Here, finally, he treated it as a "threefold" form of thought, rather than as a kind of disguised modalism (as in the Introduction, where there was only one person, the Son) or dualism (as in the Book II passage, where the two persons of Son and Father represented the unresolved tension between divine nearness and distance); tellingly, this is in a context determined by the threefold structure of his own thinking.
Perhaps in her discussion of the Sabellian or patripassian views attributed to it Trevett could have more clearly pointed to the naif modalism common in the second century.
2 in the third German edition; 196 n.2 in the English translation) Harnack finds that Dial 128 "seems to favor the idea" of modalistic conceptions before the last third of the second century as an example of Modalism. In a later study dedicated specifically to the Judaism reflected in Justin's Dialogue ("Judentum und Judenchristentum in Justins Dialog mit Trypho," Texte und Untersuchungen 39 [1913] 47-92, at 77 n.