Model energy code


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Model energy code

A building code that requires houses to meet certain energy efficiency standards such as insulation levels or energy consumption. Like most building codes, it is adopted on either a state or local basis, if at all, and may be amended.
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Furthermore, 11 states already have state building codes that exceed the minimum guidelines established by the 1989 Model Energy Code. For instance, Title 24 in California mandates certain energy standards; consequently, all new residential construction in the state automatically meet the Fannie Mae definition of an energy-efficient home.
Insulation Envelope insulation levels are based on location: (see Table A2) Infiltration ELA = 0.77 [ft.sup.2] (0.07 [m.sup.2]) (0.58 ACH) Structural mass 3.5 lb/[ft.sup.2] (17.1 kg/[m.sup.2]) of floor area, in accordance with the Model Energy Code and NFRC Annual Energy Performance Subcommittee recommendation (September 1998).
The award recognized Tucson's Spanish Trails community, where the homes are engineered to use 50 percent less energy than the model energy code and 30 percent less than required by the EPA's Energy Star homes program.
The honored programs, exceeding Model Energy Code (MEC) requirements, are the Edison Electric Institute's E Seal program; Comfort Home; the ENERGY STAR program; the Johns Manville Performance Home program; and the Alaska Craftsman Home program.
Thus, the community's homes are 30 percent more energy efficient than homes built under the standard model energy code.
The company's Retreat at the Bluffs homes, in Tucson, are already being built to standards 50 percent more efficient than the Model Energy Code (MEC).
Watt's homes meet the Environmental Protection Agency's Five Star standards, which means each house uses at least 30% less natural gas than a house built to the Model Energy Code. An independent analyst trained by Energy Rated Homes of Utah rates each home's energy efficiency.
"If we can demonstrate strong participation by the industry, we can convince governmental regulatory agencies that market-driven programs are more effective than less flexible, mandated codes." Now, many local energy codes are based on the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) Model Energy Code (MEC) for new residential construction.
The electric utility industry may be deregulated and energy efficiency requirements (like those in the Council of American Building Officials Model Energy Code) may become mandatory.
The model energy code and utility-sponsored load-management programs will be the incentives.
Q The CABO Model Energy Code is about to become a requirement in my state.
Under the 1992 Energy Policy Act, states have until the end of this year to adopt standards at least equal to the 1992 CABO Model Energy Code (MEC), or to explain why not to the federal government.
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