Moeris


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Moeris

(mēr`ĭs), ancient name of Lake Karun (Arab. Birket Qarun), c.90 sq mi (230 sq km), NE Egypt, in El Faiyum. The size of the lake is much reduced from that described by ancient travelers, such as Herodotus. Crocodilopolis (later Arsinoë) was the chief town on the lake and a residence of the Ptolemies. Ancient irrigation works were excavated in the late 1920s. By the late 20th cent. the lake, shallow and salty, measured 24 by 5 mi (40 by 8 km) and was c.40 ft (12 m) below sea level. As a result, Lake Karun is fed by a canal from the Nile River.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Beechcraft Baron 58 came down after a sudden technical failure during a training mission over a desert area in northern Lake Moeris, he added.
Durante esta etapa se llevaron al cabo ambiciosos proyectos de irrigacion para regular las grandes inundaciones del Nilo, desviandolo hacia el lago Moeris (El Fayum).
In Fayoum you can visit the famous Lake Qarun, also known as Lake Moeris.
1912) X Moeris remus (Fabiricius, 1787) X Mylon melander (Cramer, 1775) X X Mysoria thasus (Stoll, 1781) X X Niconiades ephora ssp.
The Egyptian, of which a description is given by Herodotus and Strabo, was situated to the east of the Lake of Moeris, opposite the ancient site of Arsinoe or Crocodilopolis.
of Moeris Lacus) was a trifle lighter in 2005, giving it the impression of being slightly more tapering to the north.
9-10 Tityrus keeps his land 6 Moeris takes his goats and composes poetry.
The lake is the third largest in Egypt and is part of the Fayyum Oasis, more than 100 kilometres (62 miles) south of Cairo, and part of the ancient Lake Moeris, once a body of sweet water.
Lake Qarun, is one of oldest, if not the oldest, lakes in Egypt, was known to ancient Egyptians as lake moeris, (the great lake).
building projects such as the pyramids or the labyrinth at Moeris, the
13) Although many of Virgil's Eclogues emphasize the use of dialogue to recall the literary ruins of Greece and the historical ruins of Rome, they also suggest the ineffectuality of such remembrance--most clearly in Eclogue Nine, where Moeris finds himself unable to sing in the face of Rome's ruinous chaos.
Virgil's strongest condemnation of war and its legacy is to be found in the pathetic picture of Moeris, dispossessed of his lands and his ability to sing, making his way to the city in Eclogue 9: