Muhammad Abduh

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Muhammad Abduh
BirthplaceNile Delta, Egypt
Died

Muhammad Abduh

1849–1905, Egyptian Muslim religious reformer. His encounter in 1872 with Jamal ad-Din al-Afghani, in the Cairo mosque-university of al-Azhar, led to his transition from asceticism to an activism seeking the renaissance of Islam and the liberation of the Muslims from colonialism. Abduh advocated the reform of Islam by bringing it back to its pristine state, and casting off what he viewed as its contemporary decadence and division. His views were faced by opposition from the established political and religious order, but were later embraced by Arab nationalism after World War I.
References in periodicals archive ?
"What helped me along in this journey was my association with my father, Mohammad Abduh Ganem, who was himself an accomplished poet."C
Abdullah Al-Guoud composed the music with veterans of the Gulf music scene singers Saudi Mohammad Abduh and Kuwait's Abdullah Al-Ruwaished preforming.
Magistrate Mohammad Abduh Md Hafidz ordered the 59-year-old man to be released on bail of RM50,000 in one surety after the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) made no request to extend his remand.
"About religious and philosophical views of Mohammad Abduh." Religion and social mind in the countries of the East, edited by M.
Prominent supporters of the new ideas included Jamal al-Din al-Afghani and Mohammad Abduh, who were both pro-reform in Islamic understanding and joined in the lodges.
The most noteworthy of whom were Mohammad Abduh, Rasid Rida and Qasim Amin.
Afghani's most famous disciple, Mohammad Abduh, would become the rector of Cairo's al-Azhar Seminary and a pioneer of the reformist sociopolitical approach to interpreting the Quran that underpinned the rise of salafism and its various streams.
In their search for solutions, men like Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, Mohammad Abduh and Rashid Rida sought to re-establish classical doctrines in order to bring about political, legal and intellectual reform, and in assimilating Western advances in science and technology, became known as modernists, while others such as Hasan al-Banna, Abu al-A'la al-Mawdudi and Sayyid Qutb, rejecting everything that was Western, became known as "fundamentalists." Islam, thus, came to provide a practical political, economic, social and legal life.
For instance after citing a poem by a Seljuq poet, Mohammad Abduh, Javadi writes: "Here the pun on ahl-e divan (`the officials') and divan (`the demons') cannot be reproduced in English" (p.
I came here paying the fare at the counter but when I want to go back I'm forced to buy the Nol card as there is no alternative," said Mohammad Abduh from Egypt.