Muhammad Abduh

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Muhammad Abduh
BirthplaceNile Delta, Egypt
Died

Muhammad Abduh

1849–1905, Egyptian Muslim religious reformer. His encounter in 1872 with Jamal ad-Din al-Afghani, in the Cairo mosque-university of al-Azhar, led to his transition from asceticism to an activism seeking the renaissance of Islam and the liberation of the Muslims from colonialism. Abduh advocated the reform of Islam by bringing it back to its pristine state, and casting off what he viewed as its contemporary decadence and division. His views were faced by opposition from the established political and religious order, but were later embraced by Arab nationalism after World War I.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scholarly debate over Ijtihad has been going on for well over 200 years and has produced some prominent revivalist thinkers such as Jamaluddin Afghani, a 19th Century Iranian scholar, Mohammed Abduh, his Egyptian friend and reformer, and Mohammed Iqbal, a poet philosopher from the Indian subcontinent.
In addition the directors appointed by the public shareholders are Mohammed Abduh Sattar, Ibrahim Mohammed and Ahmed Mohammed.
For instance, an online campaign demanding popular Saudi singer Mohammed Abduh cancel his performance in Jeddah was launched in December.
One of the critics of the West portrayed by Mishra, Al-Afghani's Egyptian disciple Mohammed Abduh (1849-1905), noted the disconnect between British words and deeds with respect to his country.
Likewise, Amin's contemporary, Sheikh Mohammed Abduh (1849-1905), an Al Azhar cleric, felt that Egypt's development would falter because "Muslims ...
Afghani's most important disciple was an Egyptian Sufist (or Islamic mystic) named Mohammed Abduh. According to scholar Elie Kedourie, the link between Afghani and Abduh was "very much that of the master and disciple in some secret, esoteric cult." Although raised as a Muslim believer, at some point Adbuh discarded his ancestral faith in favor of Afghani's religion of revolution.
It begins with Mohammed Abduh and ends with Zoroaster.
These movements, the usulis amongst the Shi'ites(46) (which became dominant at the end of the Eighteenth Century), and those movements associated with Sayyid Ahmad Khan,(47) al-Afgani,(48) Mohammed Abduh,(49) Qasim Amin,(50) Mohammed Iqbal(51) and Taha Husayn,(52) are thus seen as evidence of resistance to pressure of European thought on backward Seventh Century Islamic theory.(53)