Molech


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Related to Molech: Baal, Ashtoreth, Chemosh, Bohemian Grove

Molech

(mō`lĕk) or

Moloch

(mō`lŏk), Canaanite god of fire to whom children were offered in sacrifice; he is also known as an Assyrian god. He is attested as early as the 3d millennium B.C., although most known references to him come from the later period represented by the Hebrew Bible, according to which Solomon and later Ahaz introduced the worship of him into Judah. He had a sanctuary at Tophet, in the valley of Hinnom S of Jerusalem. MilcomMilcom
[Heb.,=their king], in the Bible, god of the Ammonites whose cult Solomon introduced in Jerusalem. In the Book of Judges the name is replaced (probably by mistake) by Chemosh. Milcom may be identifiable with Molech.
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 may be identifiable with Molech.

Moloch

, Molech
Old Testament a Semitic deity to whom parents sacrificed their children
References in periodicals archive ?
Unless drastic action is taken with the ruling party at the forefront, South Africa will continue to sacrifice its children to Molech.
Note the prevalence of the enigmatic Molech and Baal in the denunciations (Leviticus 20:2-6; Jeremiah 19: 1-3).
Bergmann, In the Shadow of Molech: The Sacrifice of Children and its Impact on Western Religions (New York: Columbia University Press, 1992), p.
It may be for this reason that Hand is associated with Molech of Moloch, the god to whom children were sacrificed: "The night falls thick Hand comes from Albion in his strength / He combines into a Mighty-one the Double Molech & Chemosh." (82)
The OT clearly forbids "lying with a man as with a woman." In the same paragraph (Lev 18:19-23) are also forbidden sex with a woman during her period, sexual relations with a kinsman's wife, sacrificing children to Molech, and sexual relations with an animal.
* Concerning child sacrifice, see II Kings 3:26-27 and the prohibition of sacrificing children to Molech in Leviticus 18:21; Deuteronomy 18;9-10; Jeremiah 7:30-31,19:4-5.
Conversely, texts obviously assume greater value when considering the specific language used by the ancients themselves to describe the dead or their attendant powers (met/metim, repa'im, nesama, ruah, peger, gewiyya, and others), burial and mourning customs (mourning rituals, dress codes, symbolic acts, etc.), the psychology of fear (manifested in acts of desecration and the belief that the dead can speak from beyond the grave), purity codes, inheritance patterns, conceptions of the underworld, as well as the role of certain deities within the beliefs and practices of ancient Israel (Molech and child sacrifice).
Molech, to whom children were sacrificed in the Old Testament, was the name of a deity and not the name of a kind of sacrifice (contrary to Eissfeldt).
Blake mentions the "Valley of the Jebusite" in Jerusalem (68:23), and at the "high places" of this terrible place children were burned in the fiery furnaces of Molech, a Heathen God of sacrifice.
In the Snake Text (KTU 1.100) the gods are summoned in hierarchical order from their dwellings and the eighth deity invited to take a seat and exorcise the snake venom is none other than MLK (the biblical Molech) who dwells at ttrt, Ashtarot.