Nazi-Soviet Pact

(redirected from Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact)
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Nazi-Soviet Pact

nonaggression treaty freed Hitler to invade Poland. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer, 685–705]
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Under the infamous Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, German fascist dictator Adolf Hitler and Soviet communist dictator Joseph Stalin carried out a joint Nazi-communist operation to carve up and brutally subject Poland.
It marked the 50th anniversary of the wicked Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, named after the Nazi German and Bolshevik foreign ministers who signed a peace treaty that included a secret protocol on dividing up Europe after the war, both sides assuming that neither would attack the other.
Negating the crimes of Soviet occupation in central and eastern Europe, and excusing the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact with the Nazis, provides justification for Moscow reclaiming its "zone of influence".
A decade ago, when the first Nord Stream pipeline deal was announced, Poland's then-foreign minister, Radek Sikorski, compared the venture to the 1939 Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact (the non-aggression treaty between Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Soviet Union).
Looking ahead, with Assad and Iran operating from much stronger positions, we face the risk that regional ideological adversaries will act in concert when their interests align, as in the 1939 Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact dividing Poland.
Such logic is bolstered by Putin's self-interested reinterpretation of history, which justifies the 1939 Winter War against Finland, the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939 and the 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.
To return to the Soviet analogy, the brief dalliance with the KRG might be compared to the 1939 Molotov-Ribbentrop pact, although the IS's strategic calculations in this instance more closely reflect those ascribed to Hitler, with the KRG fulfilling the role of Stalin.
In 1939, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union agreed to a non-aggression treaty, the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in Moscow.
August 23 was chosen to coincide with the date of the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in which the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany agreed to divide Eastern Europe between themselves, an event described by the European Parliament's President Jerzy Buzek in 2010 as "the collusion of the two worst forms of totalitarianism in the history of humanity.
What is neglected is that we nearly lost the war in 1940, thanks to heavy bombing of our country by the Luftwaffe, an air force well supplied with Soviet aviation spirit under the terms of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.
As the Polish armies were torn to pieces, Stalin invaded from the east (on 17 September), seizing those parts of Poland guaranteed to him under secret clauses of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.
They told the story of a fascinating back-and-forth, which culminated with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of August 1939 and subsequent partition of Poland in September of the same year.