Momotidae


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Momotidae

[mə′mäd·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The motmots, a family of colorful New World birds in the order Coraciiformes.

Momotidae

 

(motmots), a family of birds of the order Coraciiformes. Body length, 17–47 cm. The edges of the bill are serrated. The tail is graduated; the shafts of the middle rectrices are bare at the top (the birds pluck the feathers themselves). The plumage is green, with light blue, black, and red spots. There are eight species, distributed in the tropical forests of Central and South America. Motmots nest in burrows (up to 1.8 m deep) dug in cliffs or level ground. There are three or four eggs in a clutch; both parents incubate for 21 or 22 days. The young leave the nest in 28 to 31 days. Motmots feed on insects and fruits.

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Oligocene fossils bearing on the origin of the Todidae and Momotidae (Ayes: Coraciiformes).
Las familias con menor numero de especies fueron: Odonthophoridae (Perdices), Podicipedidae (Zambullidores), Phalacrocoracidae (Cormoranes), Anhingidae (Patos-aguja), Threskiornithidae (Ibis), Pandionidae (Aguila Pescadora), Charadriidae (Caravanas y Chorlitos), Scolopacidae (Andarrios, Becasinas), Tytonidae (Lechuzas), Strigidae (Buhos), Nyctibiidae (Biemparados), Momotidae (Barranqueros), Grallariidae (Tororoi), Cotingidae (Cotingas, Fruteros) Vireonidae (Verderones - Vireos), Corvidae (Carriquies o Arrendajos), Troglodytidae (Cucaracheros), Cinclidae (Mirlos Acuaticos) y Mimidae (Sinsonte) con una especie cada una respectivamente.
En el caso de las Antillas, Croizat (1958) utilizo dos familias de aves, Todidae y Momotidae, estrechamente emparentadas, para ejemplificar su critica a la biogeografia de Mayr.
Notwithstanding foraging behavior, there have also been authors who have related the increases in post-orbital and squamosal processes with the behaviors of nest-digging on earthen banks, as observed by Pascotto and Donatelli (2003) in Momotidae. According to Zyskowski and Prum (1999), all Sclerurus species make their nests in holes on earthen banks, which are excavated by the birds themselves.