monarchianism

(redirected from Monarchians)
Also found in: Dictionary.

monarchianism

(mōnär`kēənĭzəm) [Gr.,=belief in the rule of one], the concept of God that maintains his sole authority even over Christ and the Holy Spirit. Its characteristic tenet, that God the Father and Jesus are one person, was developed in two forms in early Christianity. Dynamistic monarchians, such as the TheodotiansTheodotians,
small heretical sect, formed c.190 by Theodotus, a Byzantine. It lasted until the end of the 4th cent. The Theodotians taught that Jesus was a man, who became the Christ only after his baptism (a concept basic both to monarchianism and to adoptionism).
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Paul of SamosataPaul of Samosata
, fl. 260–72, Syrian Christian theologian, heretical patriarch of Antioch. He was a friend and high official of Zenobia of Palmyra. Paul enounced a dynamic monarchianism, denying the three Persons of the Trinity.
..... Click the link for more information.
, held that Jesus was born a man and received the Christ as a power from God at a later time (see adoptionismadoptionism,
Christian heresy taught in Spain after 782 by Elipandus, archbishop of Toledo, and Felix, bishop of Urgel (Seo de Urgel). They held that Jesus at the time of his birth was purely human and only became the divine Son of God by adoption when he was baptized.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Modalistic monarchians taught that God is unknowable, except for his manifestations, or modes; Christ is one of these. Because of the consequent implication that God the Father must have died on the cross, they were called Patripassians [Lat.,= the Father suffering]. SabelliusSabellius,
fl. 215, Christian priest and theologian, b. probably Libya or Egypt. He went to Rome, became the leader of those who accepted the doctrine of modalistic monarchianism, and was excommunicated by Pope St. Calixtus I in 220.
..... Click the link for more information.
 fully developed modalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the course of his argument against the "Jewish" exegesis of the theophany at the burning bush, Justin writes, "Those who say the Son is the Father are refuted as not having known the Father nor knowing that the Father of all has a Son who also, being the first-born Logos of God, is also God." (24) One can only wonder whether the expression "those who say the Son is the Father" applies more fittingly to "all the Jews" who, according to Justin, think theophanies are apparitions of the Father of all--or to Monarchian Christians, who do operate with the terms "Father" and "Son" but in a manner that Justin finds objectionable.
In other words, Eusebius accepted the homoousios not because he had been unwillingly forced to yield to his monarchian (or Sabellian) opponents, led by Ossius and Marcellus (as is usually claimed), but rather because his theology had significant, objective affinities with Constantine's Hermetic philosophy of the consubstantiality of the two gods.
In his thought the word homoousios did not contradict the distinction of two divine ousiai, precisely because it was the heritage of the ancient Egyptian theology and of the revelation of Hermes Trismegistus, and had therefore nothing to do with the Sabellian or monarchian identification--theology of the one hypostasis.
10.27.1-2.1 bracket out what Mouraviev calls the primitive doctrine of the Montanist monarchians found in Ref.
9.10.9-10; 10.27.1-2).(123) Whether Noetus himself discussed the Old Testament theophanies is not clear in the CN.(124) That the monarchians in general talked of the invisible (creator) God and the visible God (of the theophanies) being one is made clear by Tertullian's lengthy discussion of this subject (Prax.
23, for Tertullian's use of occupatio against the monarchians.
1, and also links the exegesis to the monarchians via Prax.
43, who thinks those referred to here were `partisans of an old-fashioned Logos theology', and different from the `more clearly modalist Monarchians' referred to in 10.
120, take it to be the monarchians described in CN.
It is this basic monarchian thesis that there can be only one God, which most concerns Callistus.
The monarchian thesis, in which the Noetians included Christ, is derived from their reading of Scripture, but the patripassianist thesis is supported solely by logic based on the monarchian thesis.
The report begins by asserting that they identify the creator ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) of the universe and the Father as the same God (9.10.9; 10.27.1).(120) Mouraviev identifies this as the monarchian thesis,(121) which, in one sense it is, but it is not yet the heretical monarchian thesis, for that adds Christ to this identification.(122)