Monody


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monody

1. (in Greek tragedy) an ode sung by a single actor
2. any poem of lament for someone's death
3. Music a style of composition consisting of a single vocal part, usually with accompaniment

Monody

 

in ancient Greece, solo singing to the accompaniment of an aulos, cithara, or lyre. The term also denotes a style of solo singing with homophonic accompaniment that originated in Italy in the 16th century and gave rise to such new forms and genres as aria, recitative, opera, and cantata. In a broader sense, “monody” designates any vocal music for a single melodic line (solo, ensemble, or choral in unison or octave) or the vocal part of a composition performed with instrumental accompaniment.


Monody

 

a musical texture consisting of a single melody performed by a singer or an instrumentalist, and frequently by two or more performers (in unison or an octave apart). It differs from polyphonic texture in that no harmonies (simultaneous combinations of nonparallel sounds) are formed. Monody is the only texture found in the folk music of many peoples. The concept of monody is narrower than that of melody, which also includes melodies, a concept that is inconceivable without accompaniment. Nonetheless, “monody” sometimes refers to a solo song with instrumental accompaniment.

References in periodicals archive ?
30_ Hamilton identifies the music of this paradisiacal scene with a specific historical form: "against the secunda prattica of monody, Kleist aligns himself with the prima prattica of polyphony, where words are subordinate to music, where the individual voice melts into the voice of God" (144).
It was a product of the "new" musicians' rejection, in the last years of the sixteenth century, of polyphony in favor of monody, declamation, and (eventually) recitative.
Although the title and sub-title of "Thyrsis: A Monody, to Commemorate the Author's Friend, Arthur Hugh Clough, Who Died at Florence, 1861" create the expectation of a conventional pastoral elegy, the poem (as Giannone perceived) deviates noticeably from the classical paradigm exemplified by "Lycidas.
And keenly, Julie Paegle profuses a monody in memory of a friend to many of us, poet Craig Arnold, lost to us all.
See the discussion of Vittoria Archilei's 1589 performance in Nina Treadwell, "She Descended on a Cloud 'from the Highest Spheres': Florentine Monody 'alla Romanina,'" Cambridge Opera Journal 16, no.
Here we tread on stony ground, for there is a sharp divide between the paths of those who believe that medieval monody (secular songs and the types of lyrics under discussion) was sung like plainchant, and those who think it was performed rhythmically.
Taking the rail route, if you want my opinion, is not the most fun part of their expedition, unfurling the chromatic monody of gray wood beneath their six feet, its texture not particularly welcoming for anything not (as they are not) xylophagous.
updated monody and reflects the most recent revisions in source
This passage contains a verbatim echo of the opening line of Kreousa's monody in which she berates Apollo: w yuca, pw~ sigasw; (859).
16) Buonarroti's extraordinary literary productivity not only led to his contributions to Florentine innovations in music-theater, which culminated in the birth of opera, but also found expression in an extensive collection of unpublished lyric poetry, much of which was produced for specific court occasions and was set to music by the contemporary pioneers of monody.
The newly reconstructed poem will undoubtedly reanimate, but will definitively not resolve, a number of other classic questions, including whether Sappho wrote monody or choral poems; whether her poems were performed in public or private; and what exactly was the nature of the group of girls she gathered around her (religious, erotic, pedagogical, therapeutic preparation for marriage, etc.