Monody


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monody

1. (in Greek tragedy) an ode sung by a single actor
2. any poem of lament for someone's death
3. Music a style of composition consisting of a single vocal part, usually with accompaniment

Monody

 

in ancient Greece, solo singing to the accompaniment of an aulos, cithara, or lyre. The term also denotes a style of solo singing with homophonic accompaniment that originated in Italy in the 16th century and gave rise to such new forms and genres as aria, recitative, opera, and cantata. In a broader sense, “monody” designates any vocal music for a single melodic line (solo, ensemble, or choral in unison or octave) or the vocal part of a composition performed with instrumental accompaniment.


Monody

 

a musical texture consisting of a single melody performed by a singer or an instrumentalist, and frequently by two or more performers (in unison or an octave apart). It differs from polyphonic texture in that no harmonies (simultaneous combinations of nonparallel sounds) are formed. Monody is the only texture found in the folk music of many peoples. The concept of monody is narrower than that of melody, which also includes melodies, a concept that is inconceivable without accompaniment. Nonetheless, “monody” sometimes refers to a solo song with instrumental accompaniment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Robinson" appeared in The Oracle on 26 September 1789; the "Monody to Chatterton" appeared 11 May 1791.
The Romano anthologies corroborate the notion that Grandi made a relatively late foray into the genre of monody, for patterns of textual concordances between them and Grandi's arias suggest a printing date of late 1618 or 1619 for his earliest monodies.
Coleridge's epigraph to the "Effusions" section comes from Bowles's Monody, Written at Matlock, October 1791, published in 1791: Content, as random fancies might inspire, If his weak harp at times or lonely lyre He struck with desultory hand, and drew Some soften'd tones to Nature not untrue.(28)
These range from the use of musical monody in his Lycidas, a semiotic analysis of the poet's use of "mercantile" terminology, Bakhtinian analyses revolving around the concept of "dialogism", an overview of previous theoretical interpretations of Milton's works, to a placement of the poet in relation to his contemporaries and the major theological movements and their popular variations regarding the concept of God.
This notational device of clarifying the meaning of groups of blackened minims by insertions of the figure 3 was well known, and was given the title 'meliola' by the contemporary theorist Antonio Brunelli (1606), who explained clearly how three blackened minims occupied the time of one (void) semibreve tactus: Putnam Aldrich, Rhythm in Seventeenth-Century Italian Monody, London, 1966, pp.
As noted above, it was this lack of resources which prompted Viadana, at the time of Palestrina's death, to invent a new small-scale polyphonic style (distinct from Florentine monody), in which the organ was the basis of harmonic support.
In Armonia Favellare: Report of the International Conference on Early Opera and Monody to Commemorate the 400th Anniversary of the Italian Music Dramas of 1600, Held at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, October 5-8, 2000: A Special Issue Dedicated to the Memory of Claude V.
As the quasi-autobiographical plot nears its end, Greene abandons his narrator-hero and adopts a first person monody in which he vehemently attempts to expurgate the dangers of human vanity.
There, and indeed throughout the book, Sternfeld's approach to such terms as 'opera' and 'monody' is commendably pragmatic rather than dogmatic; for his purposes, 'terminology is less important than an awareness of the synthesis of diverse elements'.
(6) For Tomlinson's readings of the lament, see his Monteverdi and the end of the Renaissance (Berkeley, CA, 1987), pp.119-31; and |Madrigal, monody, and Monteverdi's via naturale alla imitatione', Journal of the American Musicological Society, XXXIV (1981), pp.60-108.
In discussing the music, he emphasizes, inter alia, the strong influence of the falsobordone on the entire style of Florentine monody, an influence that "few musicologists" have recognized (p.
In this scheme of things, the importance of recitative as a central ingredient of early opera is underplayed, although it does receive some attention in Chapter 2, entitled "Definitions and Non-Definitions." There, and indeed throughout the book, the author's approach to such terms as "opera" and "monody" is commendably pragmatic rather than dogmatic; for his purposes, "terminology is less important than an awareness of the synthesis of diverse elements" (55).