Monody


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monody

1. (in Greek tragedy) an ode sung by a single actor
2. any poem of lament for someone's death
3. Music a style of composition consisting of a single vocal part, usually with accompaniment

Monody

 

in ancient Greece, solo singing to the accompaniment of an aulos, cithara, or lyre. The term also denotes a style of solo singing with homophonic accompaniment that originated in Italy in the 16th century and gave rise to such new forms and genres as aria, recitative, opera, and cantata. In a broader sense, “monody” designates any vocal music for a single melodic line (solo, ensemble, or choral in unison or octave) or the vocal part of a composition performed with instrumental accompaniment.


Monody

 

a musical texture consisting of a single melody performed by a singer or an instrumentalist, and frequently by two or more performers (in unison or an octave apart). It differs from polyphonic texture in that no harmonies (simultaneous combinations of nonparallel sounds) are formed. Monody is the only texture found in the folk music of many peoples. The concept of monody is narrower than that of melody, which also includes melodies, a concept that is inconceivable without accompaniment. Nonetheless, “monody” sometimes refers to a solo song with instrumental accompaniment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Clough is the central figure in the elegy proper, as Lycidas is in Milton's monody, but when "Thyrsis" is read as a Romantic lyric, with Clough playing the role of the silent auditor/addressee, as in one of Coleridge's conversation poems, Arnold is obviously the central figure.
W]e must now study the concept of polyphony, which is distinguished [from monody, homophony, and heterophony] .
Eliot turned the modernist's monody itself into an irrepressible instrument to bridge the gap and mend sensibility's tear.
Monody, homophony, falsobordone, and imitative polyphony are combined in many of them, for example Hie est vere martyr, which also includes refrain-like repetitions, a feature of a number of these pieces.
Petr Danek has written the publication titled Tisky uicehlase hudby u Cechach (Prints of Polyphonic Music in Bohemia), which besides partial studies of music books printed during Rudolf H's era contains an extensive list of prints of vocal polyphony, music theory, tablatures and early monody which have been preserved in the territory of the Czech lands.
In the fourth chapter, she examines Seward's patriotic poems, Elegy on Captain Cook and Monody on Major Andre, both from the early 1780s.
Referring to Her Monody on the Poetess" in EBB's Poems (1850).
Songs are organized chronologically--from monody and polyphony to solo songs and songs in the theater--and then by composer, such as Albeniz, Granados, de Falla, Turina, and Rodrigo.
The dramatist also introduced the old conventions of monologue, ballet, and music, "now condemned by our realists," and pointed to their "origins in classic tragedy, monody having become monologue and the chorus ballet.
Western music could never have reached these heights without its notation, which emancipated our music from the rule of monody and improvisation and organized it around the concept of the permanent and repeatable work.
How horrible a monody there floats From their throats-- From their deep-toned throats-- From their melancholy throats