Monorhyme


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Monorhyme

 

a poem in which all the lines have the same end rhyme. Widely used in Oriental poetry, the monorhyme was the object of poetic experiments in Europe during the Middle Ages and thereafter was almost exclusively a form of humorous verse, such as A. P. Sumarokov’s “Vain Precaution” and A. N. Apukhtin’s “When You Become Students, Children.” N. Aseev’s “Wasn’t the Firmament Blue?” is a monorhyme.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gunes claims to present the texts for 145 monorhyme poems, but there are actually only 142, for (1) no.
He used monorhyme, repetition of separate syllables of a word down to full loss of its meaning with the purpose of creating a comic effect.
The only function of the possessive pronoun is to satisfy the needs of the monorhyme. Such a practice, however, is sanctioned by convention.
Of course, it is out of the question to try to reproduce in English the quantitative meters and monorhyme of the originals, or even the long lines of verse customary in Halevi's literary world.
In the Encyclopaedia of Islam it takes ten pages and three major critics to make their sketch.) We can sum it up briefly enough as a short poem (the dictionaries will sometimes name a number of lines--Shipley's Dictionary of Worm Literature specifies from 4 to 14 bayts) in monorhyme whose formal specifications are like a horny shell to protect the intimate emotion it expresses.
In the first section we have two monarhyme quatrains of octosyllables (I assume the omission of a line at the beginning), followed in the second by a monorhyme quatrain of heptasyllables.
The most popular form is the englyn unodl union ("direct monorhyme englyn"), which is a combination of a cywydd, a type of rhyming couplet, and another form and is written in an intricate pattern of alliteration and rhyme called cynghanedd.
"[R]hyme--rhyme" might appear to do the same thing, and it is indeed a direct instance of what rhetoric would call epizeuxis; yet given the momentum of the prior enjambment (allied, perhaps, to our previous experience of the dash as vocal hitch), we cannot help articulating it with at least a trace of heaviness, where the heavily stressed monorhyme ("rhyme--rhyme") draws a little too much attention to itself.
In the twentieth century, poetic modernism, mostly influenced by the West, has been so radical that it involves not only changes in perception of metaphor but also a rejection of some of the revered fundamentals of Arabic poetics, usually called `Amud al-Shi'r (literally "the pillar of poetry"), such as the unity of the poem (wahdat alqasidah) manifested in the required use of monometer and monorhyme in a poem composed of two hemistiched lines.
In the Encyclopaedia of Islam it takes ten pages and three major critics to make their sketch.) We can sum it up briefly enough as a short poem (the dictionaries will sometimes name a number of lines--Shipley's Dictionary of World Literature specifies from 4 to 14 bayts) in monorhyme whose formal specifications are like a horny shell to protect the intimate emotion it expresses.
The Rou, written in octosyllabic couplets and monorhyme stanzas of alexandrines, is a history of the Norman dukes from the time of Rollo the Viking (after 911) to that of Robert II Curthose (1106).
For if the headnote and monorhyme stanzas of the poem are gathered into vertical columns, Millais' illustration neatly bisects the page in an unbroken rectangular pane.