monotreme

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monotreme

(mŏn`ətrēm'), name for members of the primitive mammalian order Monotremata, found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea. The only members of this order are the platypusplatypus
, semiaquatic egg-laying mammal, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, of Tasmania and E Australia. Also called duckbill, or duckbilled platypus, it belongs to the order Monotremata (see monotreme), the most primitive group of living mammals.
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, or duckbilled platypus, and the several species of echidnaechidna
or spiny anteater,
animal of the order Monotremata, the egg-laying mammals. A short-legged, grayish brown animal, the echidna is covered with sharp quills and can protect itself by rolling into a tight bristly ball. It may reach 18 in. (46 cm) in length.
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, or spiny anteater. Although monotremes possess the distinguishing mammalian features of hair and mammary glands, they are unique among mammalsmammal,
an animal of the highest class of vertebrates, the Mammalia. The female has mammary glands, which secrete milk for the nourishment of the young after birth. In the majority of mammals the body is partially or wholly covered with hair; the heart has four chambers, and
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 in laying eggs rather than giving birth to live young. The eggs are like those of reptiles, with large yolks and leathery shells. Like birds and reptiles, monotremes have a single opening, the cloacacloaca
, in biology, enlarged posterior end of the digestive tract of some animals. The cloaca, from the Latin word for sewer, is a single chamber into which pass solid and liquid waste materials as well as the products of the reproductive organs, the gametes.
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, for the passage of liquid and solid wastes, the transfer of sperm, and, in the female, the laying of eggs. In addition, certain features of the skeletal structure are like those of reptiles, and the regulation of body temperature is less effective than in other mammals. Adult monotremes are toothless. The males possess spurs on their hind feet; these are connected to poison glands and are presumably used as weapons. Mammals are known to have evolved from reptiles; the monotremes probably branched off at an early stage of mammalian evolution and have retained many reptilian features. They are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Monotremata.
References in periodicals archive ?
This scenario correlates well with the timing of the divergence of the therians from the monotremes (186 or 166Ma), and also with the eutherian and marsupial spilt (160Ma).
There is some support for dividing the monotremes into two orders (Platypoda and Tachyglossa) but single order was retained in this volume.
From the other side, when we compare species with smaller differences of temperature (such as in the comparison of placental/marsupials or monotremes, or among polar fishes), we have to take into account other factors, such as GC heterogeneity (see also Section 2.5).
The platypus is a monotreme and most recently had a common ancestor with eutherians (placental mammals and marsupials) approximately 166 million years ago (Binida-Emonds et al., 2007) (Figure 5).
* Unlike other mammals, monotremes, like the platypus, never evolved to give live birth, but instead lay eggs like their amniote ancestors.
But the platypus also lays eggs - one of only two mammals, known as monotremes, to do so.
If the tree was correct, the molar thought to belong exclusively to live-bearing mammals had evolved separately in the egg-laying monotremes. Perhaps the crushing molar appeared to have only evolved once because of evidence.
* What characteristic makes monotremes different from other mammals?
The third group, monotremes, are mammals which lay eggs.
Females also have a joint urinary and genital tract, a characteristic shared with primitive mammals such as the monotremes of Australia.
Those fur coats and their ability to produce milk would make them mammals, but they also lay eggs, making them officially monotremes, a distinction they share only with the platypus.
There are three extant groups of mammals, namely, monotremes (echidna, platypus), marsupials (opossum, koala, and kangaroo) and placentals (human, ape, dog, rat, whale).