cloud forest

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cloud forest

[′klau̇d ‚fär·əst]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Species composition and biogeography of tropical montane rain forest in southern Yunnan of China.
Sanchez, "Fine litterfall and related nutrient inputs resulting from Hurricane Hugo in subtropical wet and lower montane rain forests of Puerto Rico," Biotropica, vol.
The former is a lower montane rain forest with a mean precipitation of 3456 mm and a mean annual temperature of 22.6 [degrees] C.
In the Wuzhi mountain in Hainan 249 tree species with dbh > 1.5 cm were present in a 1 ha plot in a tropical lowland rain forest (Hu & Li, 1992), and 177 tree species with dbh > 2.5 cm in a 1 ha plot in a tropical montane rain forest (An et al, 1999a).
Studies on the forest in Hainan began in the 1960's (Chang, 1963a, 1963b), and these forests were described and classified into tropical rain forest (including montane rain forest as its subtype) and tropical monsoon forest vegetation types (Guangdong Institute of Botany, 1976).
Multi-stemmed trees in montane rain forests: their frequency and demography in relation to elevation, soil nutrients and disturbance.
Many studies of soils in TMCF have reported persistently (near-)saturated conditions, which stand in sharp contrast to the more variable moisture regimes of the lower montane rain forests found below the average base of the cloud cap.
Studies on the biomass and productivity in a series of montane rain forests in Jamaica.
Previous studies of Hurricane Gilbert, which passed over Jamaica on 12 September 1988, showed that levels of mortality and damage caused to the montane rain forests during the hurricane were low compared with other forests affected by hurricanes (summarized in Brokaw and Walker 1991).
Although the overall distance, elevational gradient, and degree of disturbance for each transect differed, the vegetational cover at all sites is classified as Tropical Lower Montane Rain Forest and Tropical Premontane Rain Forest, according to the Holdridge (1967) "life zones" classification system.
Changes in forest structure, composition, and productivity permit the recognition of three forest types: tabonuco forest (150-600 m), colorado forest (600-900 m), and cloud forest (above 900 m), which correspond roughly to subtropical wet and rain forest, lower montane wet forest, and lower montane rain forest in the Holdridge Life Zone System (Ewel and Whitmore 1973).