Montanism


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Related to Montanism: Monarchianism, Donatism

Montanism

(mŏn`tənĭzəm), apocalyptic movement of the 2d cent. It arose in Phrygia (c.172) under the leadership of a certain Montanus and two female prophets, Prisca and Maximillia, whose entranced utterances were deemed oracles of the Holy Spirit. They had an immediate expectation of Judgment Day, and they encouraged ecstatic prophesying and strict asceticism. They believed that a Christian fallen from grace could never be redeemed, in opposition to the Catholic view that, since the sinner's contrition restored him to grace, the church must receive him again. Montanism antagonized the church because the sect claimed a superior authority arising from divine inspiration. Catholics were told that they should flee persecution, Montanists were told to seek it. When the Montanists began to set up a hierarchy of their own, the Catholic leaders, fearing to lose the cohesion essential to the survivial of persecuted Christianity, denounced the movement. TertullianTertullian
(Quintus Septimus Florens Tertullianus) , c.160–c.230, Roman theologian and Christian apologist, b. Carthage. He was the son of a centurion and was well educated, especially in law. Converted to Christianity c.
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 was a notable member of the movement, which died (c.220) as a sect, except in isolated areas of Phrygia, where it continued to the 7th cent. But the puristic anti-intellectual movement had many descendants—NovatianNovatian
, fl. 250, Roman priest, antipope (from 251), and theologian. He opposed the election of St. Cornelius as pope and set himself up instead. He gained followers throughout the empire because of his espousal of the idea that those fallen from grace by compromising their
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, the Donatists (see DonatismDonatism
, schismatic movement among Christians of N Africa (fl. 4th cent.), led by Donatus, bishop of Casae Nigrae (fl. 313), and the theologian Donatus the Great or Donatus Magnus (d. 355).
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), the CathariCathari
[Gr.,=pure], name for members of the widespread dualistic religious movement of the Middle Ages. Carried from the Balkans to Western Europe, Catharism flourished in the 12th and 13th cent. as far north as England.
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, and even Emanuel SwedenborgSwedenborg, Emanuel
, 1688–1772, Swedish scientist, religious teacher, and mystic. His religious system, sometimes called Swedenborgianism, is largely incorporated in the Church of the New Jerusalem, founded some years after his death.
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 and Edward IrvingIrving, Edward,
1792–1834, Scottish preacher, under whose influence the Catholic Apostolic Church was founded; its members have sometimes been called Irvingites. He was tutor to Jane Welsh, later the wife of Thomas Carlyle, and became the friend of Carlyle.
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.

Montanism

2nd-century heretical Christian movement led by prophet Montanus. [Christian Hist.: EB, VI: 1012]
References in periodicals archive ?
He notes that there are more than one hundred inscriptions alleged to have a connection with Montanism.
But it is the asceticism and unworldiness of Montanism that is, perhaps, most telling and most characteristically African.
Here Bowersock suggests that indigenous Montanism, with its celebration of sacrificial death, was perfectly paired with the tradition of public spectacles in the amphitheatre sponsored by the provincial elite.
Thus, since Justin and Irenaeus, the first two theologians to expound the parallel between Eve and Mary, came from Asia Minor, and since both the pagan cult of Cybele and the Christian Montanist sect arose in the same region, Montanism 'may have been the spark that triggered Orthodox Christian Mariology' (a century after Revelation 12
Having edited the definitive collection of inscriptions and testimonia regarding Montanism and having published several important studies, William Tabbernee is well established as the dean in this area.
The degree to which Tertullian's increasingly sectarian attitudes were attributable to Montanism remains speculative, even when it is worth noting and certainly plausible.
Known for its belief in total equality of the sexes and reliance on prophetic utterings by its members, Montanism was centered for four hundred years in the towns of Pepouza and Tymion, now in modern western Turkey.
His books include Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reaction to Montanism (Brill, 2007) and (with Peter Lampe) Pepouza and Tymion: The Discovery and Archaeological Exploration of a Lost Ancient City and an Imperial Estate in Phrygia (de Gruyter, 2008).
The New Prophecy and "New Visions": Evidence of Montanism in The Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas.
Montanism and the Primitive Church; A Study in the Ecclesial History of the Second Century, Cambridge 1878); SCHEPELERN, W.
Montanism arose in the late second century as the most prominent of competing millenaristic sects.
Tertullian chose him later to attack monarchianism in Carthage, because Praxeas opposed Montanism.