Monterone

Monterone

after humiliation, curses both Duke and Rigoletto. [Ital. Opera: Verdi, Rigoletto, Westerman, 299]
See: Evil
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Hechos aparentemente independientes--la burla al conde Monterone y la existencia de Gilda--que, por cuestiones de azar, magia o contexto social se unen provocando un mal mayor; y que, desgraciadamente, se suceden fuera de la ficcion no solo como resultado de actos reprochables sino tambien como consecuencia de ciertos gestos de valentia.
Rigoletto's sarcastic comments and participation in the Duke's escapades have won him enemies, including Count Monterone, who is furious that his daughter has been seduced by the Duke.
Giovanni Tempesta has long dreamed of becoming an opera singer in his home town of Milan, Italy; but despite his talents he lacks the money for proper training and his dreams seem futile until he meets and falls in love with the wealthy Isabella Monterone, whose father, a powerful Judge, is less than thrilled about her infatuation with a poor musician with no future.
Guillermo Ruiz, bajo-baritono, canto con una voz contundente el personaje de Monterone, el padre que tras reclamar el honor de su hija es mandado al patibulo.
Indianapolis IN Tracy Wilson, CAM Monterone Canyon Creek Austin TX Vicki Wilson, NALP, The Dolben Company Woburn MA CAM Amado Lopez, CAMT Vista Ten-ace SanYsidro CA Craig Lussier, CAMT Plantation Apartments Leominster MA Paul Morin jr., CAMT Stillwater Heights Hamsville RI David Nolan Jr., CAMT Village Walk Jacksonville FL Apartments Jesus Nungaray, CAMT Summercrest National City CA Lucas Paulino, DAMT Nevins Manor Methuen MA Walter Pina, CAMT Woodbourne Apts.
Tenor Joseph Kaiser was a notable Pylades in Iphigenia, and baritone Phillip Ens (Sparafucile) and Robert Pomakov (Count Monterone) were some of the memorable lower voices in Rigoletto.
The curse motif is associated with retribution and occurs at three strategic places in the dramatic structure: near the beginning, Rigoletto's malice against Monterone, the father of a girl seduced by the Duke, provokes Monterone to curse him; in the middle of the opera, after his own daughter Gilda has similarly been seduced by the Duke, Rigoletto assumes the role of vengeance, both for Monterone and for himself; and at the end, when Gilda dies in the Duke's place, retribution acquires an ironic as well as tragic dimension.
Details rang chillingly true: Monterone, sectioned and sedated, absolving the Duke from a wheelchair; the courtiers' serial-killer clown-masks looming through the darkness beyond Gilda's security-fenced backyard.
In Rigoletto, which is to be performed tomorrow evening and on Friday, the 49-year-old baritone sings the part of Count Monterone.
Liverpool-born Stephen Richardson makes his debut with the company singing Count Monterone in Rigoletto.
He made his debut at the Metropolitan Opera House in October, 1963, as Monterone in Verdi's "Rigoletto." Since that time, Diaz has sung in such famous opera houses as Milan's La Scala, the Paris Opera, the Salzburg Opera, the Rome Opera, the Colon Theater in Buenos Aires and the Zarzuela Theater in Madrid.
The cast also includes bass-baritone Bryan Glenn Davis, who plays two roles: Count Monterone, who curses both Rigoletto and the duke, and Sparafucile, the assassin.