mood disorder

(redirected from Mood disturbance)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

mood disorder

[′müd dis‚ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
References in periodicals archive ?
These techniques help people with the distorted thinking that's related to their mood disturbance and depression.
Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) can also be calculated through the questionnaire by adding the negative and subtracting the positive subscales.
Tam Donnelly and Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) researchers, has found that Arab women hospitalised for acute cardiac conditions suffered higher mood disturbance and depression than their male counterparts.
These symptoms are accompanied by decreased daytime functioning, with fatigue, daytime sleepiness, problems with concentration or memory, mood disturbance, reduced motivation and proneness to errors/ accidents.
A secondary outcome was the patient's emotional experience after surgery, which was operationalized as mood disturbance.
PBA also can be differentiated from bipolar disorder (BD) with rapid cycling or mixed mood episodes because of PBA's relatively brief duration of laughing or crying episodes--with no mood disturbance between episodes--compared with the sustained changes in mood, cognition, and behavior seen in BD.
TEHRAN (FNA)- A new study showed that poor sleep quality is strongly associated with mood disturbance and lower quality of life among people with extreme obesity.
Although much more work is needed, our results suggest that sleep deprivation and poor sleep quality may lead to daytime sleepiness and undesirable consequences, including low academic achievement, mood disturbance, and low well-being.
Seminal studies by Morgan and colleagues demonstrated that increases in training load among swimmers were reliably associated with increases in mood disturbance scores.
Overall mood was measured using Total Mood Disturbance, an aggregate measure of the Profile of Mood States Short Form (McNair and Heuchert, 2005) subscales of Tension (e.
8-14) Although most women do not experience a significant mood disturbance during the menopausal transition, studies have shown that they are more vulnerable to depression at this time.
Relative to those with stable incomes, participants with spill-related income loss had significantly worse scores on tension/anxiety, depression, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance scales; had higher rates of depression; were less resilient; and were more likely to use behavioral disengagement as a coping strategy.