moonlight

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moonlight

light from the sun received on earth after reflection by the moon

Moonlight

An open source version of Microsoft's Silverlight from the Mono project. Moonlight provides a runtime engine that allows Silverlight applications to run on Linux and also provides a Linux software development kit (SDK) for building Silverlight applications. Microsoft and Novell are sponsors of the project, which issued the first public release of Moonlight in the spring of 2008. For more information, visit www.mono-project.com. See Silverlight and Mono.
References in periodicals archive ?
Growth has been steady for Moonlighting. By spring 2014, the company had received $500,000 from 16 angel investors, and the co-founders left their day jobs later that year.
Wage rate of second job, accumulative wage of more than one second jobs, employment status and cadre, hours of work at second job, location and marital status were found significant in determining moonlighting. Based on its findings, the study recommended that moonlighting may be encouraged which may not only enhance moonlighter's income but also their efficiency.
Keywords: Moonlighting, job satisfaction, additional income, blocked promotion, skill diversity, Job autonomy.
15 June 2015 - US-based nationwide mobile labour marketplace Moonlighting has closed USD1.9m in funding led by US-based media firm The McClatchy Co.
The premise of Moonlighting was that Maddie and David were partners in running The Blue Moon Detective Agency who solved mysteries via a succession of comedy misadventures.
This may be due to the fact that some occupations offer fewer hours to workers or have irregular work schedules, which may make moonlighting more necessary or amenable.
Keywords: Moonlighting, Labour Mobility, Occupational Association
First, moonlighting has played, and can be expected to continue to play, a visible role in the U.S.
The pair starred as private detectives David Addison and Maddie Hayes but Moonlighting was anything but a conventional crime drama.
A human resources manager said while there are legal implications for moonlighting, he was totally for it.
EXHAUSTED nurses are putting lives at risk and costing the NHS pounds 800million a year by moonlighting as temps, says a new study.