Moore machine


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Moore machine

[′mu̇r mə‚shēn]
(computer science)
A sequential machine in which the output depends uniquely on the current state of the machine, and not on the input.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Moore machine is a six-tuple Mo = (Q,[SIGMA], [DELTA], [delta],[lambda],[q.sub.0]), where
Let us take a look at a Moore machine with the transition diagram presented in Fig.
Jeffrey Banks and Rangarajan Sundaram [4] have shown if we use preferences which are lexicographic in complexity and use the number of transitions in the Moore machine as the measure of complexity, the only Nash equilibrium machine defects always.
A Moore machine is described by a four-tuple <Q, [q.sub.0], [Lambda], [Mu]>, where Q = {[q.sub.0], [q.sub.1], [q.sub.2],..., [q.sub.m]} is a finite set of states, [q.sub.0] [Epsilon] Q is the initial state, [Lambda] : Q [right arrow] {C, D} is the output function which maps the state into a strategic choice, and [Mu] : Q x {C,D} [right arrow] Q is te transition function which maps the current state and the opponent's choice into a state (not necessarily different).
A similar heuristic approach is used in the paper by Maragarita Spichakova "An approach to the inference of finite state machines based on a gravitationally-inspired search algorithm" for generation of Moore machines, a version of final state machines with output.
Based on the company's success with 4.5" impellers, TAPS plans to use the Moore machines on impellers up to 10," assuming demand for those sizes ramps up.
TAPS has tuned the Moore machines to operate at a 25 to 50 percent higher loop gains than leading European competitors, reducing following error to virtually zero.
Moore machines, the most popular form of automaton used in the game theory literature, are explained.