Moraxella

(redirected from Moraxella catarrhalis)
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Moraxella

[mə′rak·sə·lə]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria that are parasites of mucous membranes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on nasopharyngeal carriage with Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in a randomized controlled trial.
Not only do persons with chronic bronchitis experience viral infections, they commonly develop bacterial infections, generally from Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.
influenzae have increased, as has the prevalence of beta-lactamase-producing Moraxella catarrhalis.
The most common pathogens cited are aerobes and facultative anaerobes that include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Moraxella catarrhalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and S.
Cocuklarda ve adolesanlarda Streptoccus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis akut bakteriyel sinuzitin bakteriyel etkenleridir (1).
Three species of bacteria account for most of the bacterial isolates in ABS and AOM: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis [9-11].
The choice of antibiotic should reflect the local patterns of antibiotic sensitivity to micro-organisms such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (see Table I).
The most frequently isolated bacteria were the usual culprits: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.
6,7) The bacteria most often isolated from patients with ABMS are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus.
influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis or Streptococcus pneumoniae and community-
The guidelines evaluated 19 antibiotics based on a theoretic analysis that incorporated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from clinical trials, pathogen distribution, and in vitro activity of the various agents against the three predominant pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis (Otolaryngol.
While amoxicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) (Septra/Bactrim), erythromycin and doxycycline are still flrstline drugs for upper and lower respiratory tract infections, it is important to save Ceftin, Vantin, Spectracef, Avelox, Levaquin and Tequin for cases involving resistant pneumococcus, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae.