Moresca


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Moresca

 

a music and dance scene (type of ballet) in 16thand 17th-century Italian theater. It developed from an old dance of the same name that was popular in Spain in the Middle Ages and in other European countries from the beginning of the 15th century. The moresca was performed at the end of court presentations and festivities. C. Monteverdi introduced it in the finale of the opera La Favola d’Orfeo (1607).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Castro I., Lazzari, A.P., Moresca, R., Petrelli, E.,et Rodrigues, K.
European acts include La Moresca Antica (Italy), Les Souilles de Fond de Cale (Brittany) Qftry (Poland) and Armstrong's Patent (Holland).
Performers include Bernie Davis, Stormalong John, Johnny Collins, the Boat Band, La Moresca Antica, Hugh Jones (ex- Spinner), Armstrong's Patent, Four and Aft, Les Souilles de Fond de Cale, Liverpool Tradition and many more.
Zeffirelli's feast, by contrast, is a family celebration defined by an elegant Moresca filmed with a handheld camera.
In celebration a pageant known as a "Moresca" was performed.
Sevilla midfielder Enzo Moresca also expects a tough night and said: "There are no favourites and Espanyol have already beaten us twice in the past two seasons.
Most sources agree that the English morris dance derives its name from the Spanish moresca, or "Moorish dance." In Spain the dance is supposed to represent the encounter between Moors and Christians, and it retains this theme in its name (Moros y Cristianos); (3) Covarrubias's Spanish dictionary (1611) defines "Moriscos" as Moors who have converted to Christianity ("Moriscos.
I luoghi, ovvero l'ambientazione del romanzo moresco, e le tipologie dei personaggi di parte moresca sono al centro dell'analisi dei capitoli che compongono la seconda parte del libro.
They danced the gioiosa, the chirintana, and the moresca, and at one point one of the brigata emerged from a room travestito in one of Lucrezia's own dresses.(23) So far as canti carnascialeschi themselves are concerned, for solid internal reasons the canzona de' confortini is datable before 1478 (the year of the Pazzi Conspiracy), and very possibly as early as 1474 (ten years before Isaac's arrival in Florence in 1484, only after which could he have set it to new music).(24) A letter from Piero Cennini to Pirrino Amerino describing the Feast of San Giovanni in 1475 is highly suggestive because of its description of boys on stilts hidden beneath the effigies of giants painted on paper, or appearing as spiritelli roaming the city together with fauns and centaurs: