Morganatic Marriage


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Morganatic Marriage

 

a marriage between parties of unequal rank, in which the wife or husband, and children, do not enjoy the class privileges of the spouse. An example of a morganatic marriage would be the marriage of a man belonging to a royal house with a woman from a common family. Such a morganatic marriage confers the rights of succession to the throne neither to the wife nor to the couple’s children.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(Grand Duke Aleksandr Mikhailovich was about to follow their example, but his mistress refused the offer.) In 1902, Nicholas sent Paul Meksandrovich into exile for contracting a morganatic marriage with the divorced wife of a colonel.
The decree introduced the principle of "unequal" or morganatic marriages into Russian law--developed by German royal houses wishing to impart a degree of flexibility to marriage rules by allowing princes wishing to embark on second marriages to wed spouses not of royal lineage by forfeiting royal titles and rights for their progeny.
The purpose of this study shall be to analyze the scope and the constitutional implications of the second paragraph of the preamble to the Statute of Westminster on a morganatic marriage in the royal family.
There is talk of a morganatic marriage, in which he would reign but she would just be Mrs Camilla Windsor.
I think it should be a morganatic marriage - Camilla would not become queen."
Public opinion may forever stand in the way of Camilla Parker Bowles being crowned Queen, but couldn't she and Prince Charles enter into a "morganatic marriage"?
There was the possibility of a Morganatic marriage, in which Mrs Simpson would remain a commoner, but this would require Pa rliamentary legislation, and all the signs were that Baldwin and the House of Commons would be against it.
And although plenty of monarchs have had mistresses, there is no precedent for a morganatic marriage. Even the late Duke of Windsor would not entertain the idea of such a union to Wallis Simpson.
Charles cannot enter into a morganatic marriage (as was once suggested for Mrs Simpson), as our constitutional law does not permit it.
Adolph confirms that this long, affectionate union did in fact exist between the Queen and Jermyn (morganatic marriages were not uncommon at this time, especially on the Continent), but he deduces that theirs was very probably a "chaste, Platonic" bond.