Morrison

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Morrison

1. Herbert Stanley, Baron Morrison of Lambeth. 1888--1965, British Labour statesman, Home Secretary and Minister for Home Security in Churchill's War Cabinet (1942--45)
2. Jim, full name James Douglas Morrison. 1943--71, US rock singer and songwriter, lead vocalist with the Doors
3. Toni, full name Chloe Anthony Morrison. born 1931, US novelist, whose works include Sula (1974), Song of Solomon (1977), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998): awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1993
4. Van, full name George Ivan Morrison. born 1945, Northern Irish rock singer and songwriter. His albums include Astral Weeks (1968), Moondance (1970), Avalon Sunset (1989), and Days Like These (1995)
References in periodicals archive ?
Cramsie has little to offer to ongoing debates about the politics of chorography, nor does he question how and why the idiosyncratic Moryson departs from that genre.
O'Neill, up until his death in 1616, attempted to return to Ireland; (36) O Cianain, like the secretaries Gerald and Moryson before him, most likely expected to return as well.
Bargrave's diary is most informative in describing the poor economic conditions endured by the subject populations of the Ottoman Empire; and similarly to Moryson, he identifies the Greeks collectively by their religion.
One might object that Elizabethan and Jacobean justice was every bit as cruel and bloody as the awful spectacle that Moryson witnessed.
(74.) Fynes Moryson remarked that, among the foreigners in Rome, Germans were the most isolated ethnic group, "never attaining the perfect use of any forreigne Language, be it never so easy." A German, who was mocked for spending thirty years in Italy without learning the language, replied, without blinking: "Ah lieber, was kan man doch in dreissig Jahre lehrnen?" (An Itinerary.
Cunningham maintains that Keating intended to refute the disparaging images of Ireland and its people as portrayed by Giraldus Cambrensis, Edmund Campion, Meredith Hanmer, Edmund Spencer, Fynes Moryson, Richard Stanihurst and Sir John Davies.
With reference to national origins we find 'true naturall Englishmen' (1556), 'naturall Scottismen' (1572), 'Good and naturall English words' (1579), 'a natural Venetian' (1624) and so on, and specifically with reference to languages: 'All the Candians speaking Italian as well as their naturall Greek tongue' (Moryson 1617); 'The Sclavonians [...] made suit unto the Pope to have the publick Service in their natural Tongue' (Heylin 1657-61).
So the seventeenth century traveller Fynes Moryson writes that "throughout all Germany they lodge betweene two fetherbeds," and in A Tramp Abroad Mark Twain describes the "narrow ...
`The common sort', Fynes Moryson observed, `use well water, and raine water kept in cesternes': Fynes Moryson, An Itinerary, 3 vols.
By 1592, Thomas Nashe (1567-1601) was able to smirk at the popularity of "English beere" in "The Germanies and lowe Dutch." Fynes Moryson (1566-1630) reported that some 300 English brewers were employed in the Dutch town of Delft, and that the English beers exported to the Netherlands were in fact superior to those available in England, quite possibly because they were given more time to age.
In one of the OED's examples of 'serene' as 'noxious dew', from the 1617 translation of Fynes Moryson's Itinerary, the word is spelt exactly as in the 1609 Sonnets: 'When the Syren or dew falls at night, they keepe themselves within dores till it be dried up' (Itin.
However, an essay in English largely based on it, apparently written in the hand of Richard Moryson, is to be found in the Public Record Office.(7) This has been seen as part of the preparatory work for the Institution of a Christian Man, or Bishops' Book, of 1537.(8) However, like this essay, it begins with enough references to the foreign situation for us to suppose that it, too, had an eye to the negotiations with the Lutherans.(9) Moryson's work is clearly secondary to the present one, as comparison with the sources of De Sacramentis immediately shows (for example, the use of Melanchthon's Loci Communes).(10)