Moschi


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Moschi

 

the ancient Greek name for the Meskhi, a Georgian tribe that lived in southwestern Georgia. The name may have been related to the tribal name of the Mushki. Between the first century B.C. and the first century A.D., the Moschi inhabited the region of the Meskhi Mountain Range and the border area between Iberia (the ancient name of eastern Georgia), Armenia, and Colchis.

References in periodicals archive ?
The evening's event also kicked off #GREYOUT, Wu's two-week takeover of the 3,500-square-foot space, with nine limited-edition capsule collaborations (Moleskin, Moschi), all presented in the same custom gray hue.
De igual forma, tomamos en cuenta las reflexiones sobre los ideofonos de autores como Dawyez y Moschi (2003) y otros autores; en cuanto a la pragmatica, aludimos a las reflexiones de Escandell (2003) principalmente.
Antoniucci D, Valenti R, Migliorini A, Moschi G, Bolognese L, Cerisano G, et al.Direct infarct artery stenting without predilation and no-reflow in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
44; Bennett's suppositions (2006:84) on the 'Moschi' (an archaic term for one of the ethnic groups, from which the Caucasian Iberians developed), rather than Heniochi, and his conjectures about Roman praesidia toward the Darial Pass in 58 merit no credence.
A somewhat analogous situation to that in Dillon appears in Moschi v.
706-970 [note e commento]), e numerose eco del tema sono rinvenibili nella rimeria trecentesca (Niccolo Soldanieri, Giovanni Pigli, Lorenzo Moschi, Matteo Frescobaldi, in Rimatori del Trecento, a c.
mitte levis spes et certamina divitiarum et Moschi causam: cras nato Caesare festus dat veniam somnumque dies; impune licebit 10 aestivam sermone benigno tendere noctem.
1116), and soon made a reputation as a great conqueror; his first campaign subdued the Moschi, who had overrun some Assyrian provinces along the upper Euphrates; he next conquered Commagene (region between the Toros Daglari and the Euphrates, now southeastern Turkey) and then invaded Cappadocia (central Turkey), driving out the Hittites; next he raided into the Kurdish mountains to the north (1115-1112); he attacked Comana (exact site unknown) in Cappadocia, and left an account of his victories on a copper plate inside a fortress he built to guard his new conquests (1111); he later undertook campaigns against the Aramaeans in northern Syria; thrice he advanced as far as the sources of the Tigris (1110-1100); he died about 1093.